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Why Curiosity Matters

5 Ways to Strengthen Curiosity at Work

  1. Hire for curiosity. Identify naturally curious people through interview questions and tests.
  2. Model inquisitiveness. Leaders can encourage curiosity throughout their organizations by being inquisitive themselves. 
  3. Emphasize learning goals. Framing work around learning goals rather than performance boosts motivation.
  4. Let employees explore and broaden their interests.
  5.  To support curiosity,  encourage people to ask good questions.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Why Curiosity Matters

Why Curiosity Matters

https://hbr.org/2018/09/curiosity

hbr.org

4

Key Ideas

Fewer decision-making errors

Curiosity leads us to generate alternatives.

When our curiosity is triggered, we are less likely to fall prey to confirmation bias (looking for information that supports our beliefs rather than for evidence suggesting we are wrong) and to stereotyping people (making broad judgments).

More innovation

Encouraging people to be curious generates workplace improvements

When we are curious, we view tough situations more creatively. Studies have found that curiosity is associated with less defensive reactions to stress and less aggressive reactions to provocation. 

Reduced group conflict

Curiosity encourages members of a group to put themselves in one another’s shoes and take an interest in one another’s ideas rather than focus only on their own perspective. Thus, conflicts are less heated, and groups achieve better results.

5 Ways to Strengthen Curiosity at Work

  1. Hire for curiosity. Identify naturally curious people through interview questions and tests.
  2. Model inquisitiveness. Leaders can encourage curiosity throughout their organizations by being inquisitive themselves. 
  3. Emphasize learning goals. Framing work around learning goals rather than performance boosts motivation.
  4. Let employees explore and broaden their interests.
  5.  To support curiosity,  encourage people to ask good questions.

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4 kinds of behavior

4 kinds of behavior

... account for 89 percent of leadership effectiveness:

  • Solving problems effectively;
  • Operating with a strong results orientation;
  • Seeking different perspectives;

Effective problem solving

Problem-solving - when information is gathered, analyzed, and considered. 

Difficult to get right, yet this process is a key input into decision making, for both major issues and daily ones.

Results orientation

Leadership is about not only developing and communicating a vision and setting objectives but also following through to achieve results. 

Leaders with a strong results orientation tend to emphasize the importance of efficiency and productivity and to prioritize the highest-value work.

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Motivation to learn

We have an impressive ability to learn, but our motivation to do so tends to decrease with age:

  • As children, we are naturally curious and free to explore the world around us. ...

Knowledge and expertise

In this digital age, knowledge and expertise have been devalued.

What you know is now less relevant than what you can learn, and employers are less interested in hiring people with particular expertise than with the general ability to develop the right expertise in the future.

Access to information

When we can all retrieve the same information, the key differentiator is not access to data, but the ability to make use of it, the capacity to translate the available information into useful knowledge.

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The successful interdisciplinary team

The key to creating innovative solutions is to bring together a diverse group of people to tackle every project from Day 1.

Having an interdisciplinary team with varying skills and kno...

Leave room for real dialogue

Interdisciplinary teams have to leave room so that real work can get done. Because they have multiple projects, they try to limit the loss of brainpower by working for days together on one project instead of jumping between tasks.

Working together in this way ensures that people know everything that is going on, and this allows for debate and questioning that comes with bringing diverse thinkers together.

‘Psychologically safe’ environment

Successful teams allow for mistakes. The team members feel safe to be as creative as possible.

Every aspect can be re-engineered to allow for internal team feedback, allowing the team to self-manage, and for the team to know that their individual successes are meaningfully linked to the success of the group.

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