A catalyst for romance

The plane crush can serve a function - it can make flying less miserable. It can help you cope with probably the worst part of travelling.

Even the plane's design can lend itself to flirtatious imaginings. The small seats and little leg room can be oddly romantic. Researchers found that when people are in anxiety-inducing situations, they may misattribute the feeling of nerves for attraction. It makes it then not unusual to believe you could meet someone you like on a plane.

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The persistent myth of finding love on a plane

vox.com

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The idea that travel is a catalyst for romance

A 2008 study that surveyed 5,000 flyers found that one in every 50 people said they met the love of their life on a flight.

  • This expectation is regularly reinforced by movies and television, where an in-flight experience changes the character's life.
  • Another is the rise of transformative travel. Vacation is sold as a form of therapy. When planning for a vacation, the anticipation of travelling is especially thrilling for singles to imagine that they may find romance along the way.

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The first scheduled passenger flight

The first scheduled passenger airline service took off on Jan 1, 1914. Thomas Benoist designed the "flying boat", the pilot was Tony Jannus, and Abram C. Pheil was the first paying passenger.

The 21-mile (34-kilometre) flight took 23 minutes, flying from St. Petersburg to Tampa, Fla. The plane flew no higher than 50 feet (15.2 m) over the water. Halfway, the engine misfired, and Jannus touched down in the bay, made adjustments and took off again. When the plane landed, they were swarmed by a cheering crowd of about 3,500.

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World’s First Commercial Airline | The Greatest Moments in Flight

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What will people actually be able to see and experience on a space trip?

The biggest perk of traveling to space is the view. Just past the boundary between space and Earth, passengers can catch a stunning glimpse of our planet juxtaposed against the wide unknown of space. The view is meant to be awe-inducing, and the experience even has its own name: the Overview Effect. 

Another perk of these trips is that space tourists will feel a few minutes of microgravity, which is when gravity feels extremely weak. That will give them the chance to bounce around a spacecraft weightlessly before heading back to Earth.

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Six questions to consider before launching yourself into space

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