Social Curiosity: Overt Vs Covert

Overt Social Curiosity

  • It means having an underlying interest in knowing what makes other people tick and other people's thoughts, feelings, and behavior.
  • Having OSC is a link to healthy psychological outcomes such as open-mindedness and agreeableness.

Covert Social Curiosity

  • The information gathered about other people with CSC is through indirect means of discovering what other people are like such as gossiping or snooping.
  • Those who have CSC have less adaptive psychological outcomes.

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What Are the Five Dimensions of Curiosity? | Psychology Today

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The Four Types of Curious People
  1. The Fascinated - These are people who scored high on all dimensions of curiosity, most especially joyous exploration.
  2. The Problem Solvers - They are high on deprivation sensitivity while medium on other dimensions.
  3. The Empathizers - They are high on social curiosity while being medium on other dimensions; and
  4. The Avoiders - which are low on all dimensions, particularly stress tolerance.

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  1. Joyous Exploration: It is a dimension where an individual recognizes the desire to seek out new knowledge and information with a subsequent joy of learning.
  2. Deprivation Sensitivity: This dimension has a distinct emotional tone where anxiety and tension are more prominent than joy. We often ponder abstract and complex ideas, create solutions for problems, and reduce the gaps in our knowledge.
  3. Stress Tolerance: This dimension is all about the willingness of an individual to embrace the distressing feelings that come with exploring new and unexpected events.
  4. Social Curiosity: This dimension is an individual's interest in knowing about what other people are thinking and doing through observation, making social gestures, or listening to conversations.
  5. Thrill Seeking: This dimension shows the willingness of a person to take the physical, social, and financial risks in order to acquire experiences they are curious about.

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