The Zen Dilemma of Non Attachment - Deepstash
The Zen Dilemma of Non Attachment

The Zen Dilemma of Non Attachment

The Eastern philosophy, which includes Zen, teaches us about desiring nothing and being attached to nothing or no one.

Being unattached to our pleasures, family and the good things in life was easy thousands of years ago, when there were few material possessions for the average person.

The dilemma is that by being actively unattached to anything, the person is attached to the belief and desire for non-attachment.

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Being present isn’t something we do intentionally, but is the only state we can ever be in. What changes is how we identify ourselves, or our self. Once we detach our identity with our goals, hopes, dreams and thoughts, we begin to realize that we are just a witness, and nothing was ever truly ours.

Our clinging to our identification, or the ego, is the main problem, and we need to understand that life is a game we are playing, and there is no need to identify with our character.

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The catch to the dilemma of non-attachment is the way we define our desires and attachments.

If we begin from a basic understanding that in life, everything is lost in the end, everything, as nothing was truly ours, the concept of non-attachment comes to light. We must be willing to accommodate the inevitable loss.

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Zen In The Arts

Zen has no goal. A world that focuses on destinations, that only cares about getting somewhere as fast as possible, becomes a world without substance.

Zen is a liberation from time. If we open our eyes and see clearly, it becomes obvious that there is no other time than this instant, and that the past and future are abstractions without any concrete reality.

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Bruce Lee

“Like everyone else, you want to learn the way to win, but never to accept the way to lose, to accept defeat, to learn to die is to be liberated from it. So when tomorrow comes, you must free your ambitious mind, and learn The Art of Dying.”

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The History Of Zen
  • 1500 years ago, the founding of the the Ch’an (Zen) school
  • 12th century C. E. , the concept arrives in Japan
  • 1, 300 years ago Zen reaches Korea and Vietnam.
  • Late 19th century, it reaches Europe and North America.
Each country has established its own definitions and practices, but all are based on the original ideas of the Ch’an School, which is why the most colloquial term around the world for following a Zen lifestyle is “Zen Buddhism”.

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