Roles of a Mentor - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

5 Key Roles Mentors Play

Roles of a Mentor

  • Teacher: being a role model, provides information, and understands what the mentee needs.
  • Sponsor: helping the mentee with opportunities and promotes the mentee's skills to others.
  • Cheerleader: serves as a motivation and challenge at the same time to help the mentee improve.
  • Counselor: listening, clarifying, and giving the mentee advice.
  • Friend: engaging in more than a professional relationship to support the mentee in his personal and professional growth.

52 SAVES


EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Mentoring

Mentoring is about being able pass knowledge to someone who would benefit from it.

Mentoring programs usually have four key elements:

  • Improving performance
The Roles of a Mentor
  • M-anage the relationship
  • E-ncourage
  • N-urture
  • T-each
  • O-ffer mutual respect
  • R-espond to the learner's needs
Different Roles of the Mentor
  • Learning Consultant: The mentor must help the learner to clarify his goals and identify the learning style needed.
  • Coach: The mentor should have the will to help the learner explore the problem and try new ways of working.
  • Counselor: When the learner is struggling to think, the mentor could listen, reflect, and clarify to help the learner gain insight.
  • Adviser or Information Resource: Share insights with the learner for faster and better understanding.
  • Role Model: Sometimes, the learner does not only learn from what the mentor teaches, but from how the mentor acts.
  • Critical Friend: The mentor can also simply be a friend, however, it is the most difficult because it requires the willingness to listen, encourage, draw out, reflect, challenge, and provide feedback about ideas.
Mentoring and Coaching

The terms mentoring and coaching are often mistakenly interchanged. Although they are similar, they are not the same when it comes to approach.

  • Mentoring - long-term relationship ...
History and Definition of Mentorship

The word "mentor" was first used in Homer's epic poem "The Odyssey" when Odysseus entrusted the care of his kingdom to Mentor who served as a teacher and overseer to Odysseus' son.

This is where mentor was derived meaning "a trusted councelor or guide."

Why Seek Out a Mentor

A mentor is not someone who gives you direct answers, but someone who challenges you to know the right answer. 

And in life, you can't be spoon-fed all the time. The role of a mentor is to guide you and give you the wisdom in knowing the answer.

What Makes a Good Mentor
  • Sincere and have the desire to develop and help others even without any price.
  • Prepared to commit time and energy to the mentoring relationship.
  • Have the relev...
What Makes a Good Mentee
  • He's committed to expanding capabilities and focused on achieving professional results.
  • Clear about their career goals, needs, and wants.
  • Willing to ask for help.
  • Able to seek and accept positive or negative feedback.
  • Personally responsible and accountable.
  • Ready, willing, and able to meet on a regular basis.
The Mentoring Relationship

To develop a successful mentoring relationships:

  • Design the Alliance. Both parties must have an agreement on the contact and response times, meetings, confidentiality, focus, feedback, and goals and accountability.
  • Get to Know Each Other. It is important to have a strong relationship and trust before focusing on the problem.
  • Set the Agenda. Be clear on the purpose and goals of the program.
  • Reflect and Evaluate. Know if there is a progress or development gained from the mentoring every few meetings.
  • Closeout. Before parting ways, have a closure with each other. Reflect and appreciate what both parties have learned and gained from the experience.