1. Print your current slide deck as 9-up handouts. - Deepstash
1. Print your current slide deck as 9-up handouts.

1. Print your current slide deck as 9-up handouts.

The 9-up format is conveniently the same size as the smallest sticky note. Keep trimming and trimming until you feel you are close to 18 minutes.

During this process it becomes clear that your big idea can be communicated in a succinct, distilled manner.

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MORE IDEAS FROM 10 Ways to Prepare for a TED Style Talk

8. Don’t be camera shy.
  • Videotape some of your final practices. It doesn’t have to be a high-end video setup. Videotaping yourself helps you get used to looking at the camera, and you can review the video to look at your stage presence, eye contact, gestures, plus identify any expressions that need modification.
  • Also, if you do an especially good practice run, you can go back and listen to the audio and add the best snippets to your slide notes.

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2. Solicit feedback

Assemble a handful of people who are effective presenters that you trust to give honest, unfiltered feedback on your narrative and slides.

Have them give you feedback on the content you’ve chosen and ask whether they think it will resonate with your audience.

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3. Rehearse with a great (honest) communicator.

Choose someone you trust and also that understands how to give a TED Talk, and rehearse with them.

You love your material and you want to include all of it, but if you want to master how to give a TED Talk successfully, you need someone you trust to help you murder your darlings.

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  1. Once you’re within the timeframe, begin practicing with the clock counting down.
  2. You need to set a few places in your talk where you benchmark a time stamp.
  3. Calculate where you need to be in the content in six-minute increments. You should know roughly where you should be at 6, 12 and 18 minutes.
  4. You should know which slide you should be on and what you’re saying so that you will know immediately from the stage if you’re on time or running over.

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Right before you go onstage (we’re talking day-of), do one more timed rehearsal. This will ensure that you know the speech and that you’re well aware of where you might need to slow down or speed up.

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  1. The first few times, rehearse with the clock counting up. That’s because if you go over, you need to know how much you’re over.
  2. Do NOT be looking at the clock at this time. Have your coach look at it because you don’t want to remember any of the timestamps in your mind.
  3. Finish your entire talk and then have your coach tell you how much you need to trim. Keep practicing until you’re consistently within 18 minutes.

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10. Have two natural ending points

Pick two natural places you could stop in your talk, then demarcate those as possible endings.

That way, if you’re running way over, you can stop at your first ending point, and while your audience may miss out on some inspirational or emotional ending, they’ll have heard all of the most important information that matters.

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7. Be noteworthy.
  • Your coach is there to jot down what you say well and what you don’t.
  • They should work from a printout of the slides and write phrases you deliver effectively so they can be added to your script.
  • They should help you capture phrases so you can type them into your notes.

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4. Close the loop.

A lot of times, as the presenter, you know your material so well that you think you’re making each key point clear. You might not be. Your coach should make sure you are telling people why.

  • It’s the “why” around our ideas that make them spread, not the “how.”

Articulate the why so your audience understands what’s magnificent about your big idea.

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RELATED IDEA

A TED Talk is 18 minutes long

TED curator Chris Anderson explains:
The 18-minute length works much like the way Twitter forces people to be disciplined in what they write. By forcing speakers who are used to going on for 45 minutes to bring it down to 18, you get them to really think about what they want to say. What is the key point they want to communicate? It has a clarifying effect. It brings discipline.”

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The TED-Style Talk
  • This type of talk is scripted and carefully rehearsed, then delivered without notes, from memory.
  • It is professionally visualized. The slides, videos, or animations are generally well-crafted.
  • Ted-style talks are videotaped from several different angles and skillfully edited.

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You don’t care enough about the audience

Most people think they are the most important player in a presentation. They are wrong. The audience, the listeners, the people watching the presenter are the most important players.

Care about the audience, creating messages and stories that resonate with them and inspire them.

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