🗂

Career

79 STASHED IDEAS

  • Instead of considering immediate needs, identify higher-order needs as they will always be relevant and lead to more comprehensive solutions.
  • Devise a description of the world the team wants to create, rather than creating a financially oriented five-year plan.
  • Align action with intention. Run a collaborative design sprint with key stakeholders. Instead of using the sprint to create new products or features, use it to arrive at new futures.
  • Build a shared mission.
Rosalie P. (@rosaliep210) - Profile Photo

@rosaliep210

🗂

Career

A first step is leaders' intent toward something greater than personal success. The intent may result from an intrinsic motivation to leave a positive legacy, or they may be compelled by investors, employees, or outside pressure such as governments.

But intent is not enough. Issuing a new purpose, sympathy, and compassion are only helpful if a company proactively designs the future they want to work toward. Given that futures will be bleak if design continues to ignore the environment, more companies should consider a planet-centred design.

Leaders, employees, customers, shareholders, and citizens are looking to achieve new levels of success that is wider, deeper, and more sustaining.

This creates an uncommon opportunity for companies that don't operate by default - they don't continue in the tried-and-tested or dabble around the edges. With clarity and intention, companies can design their future.

Companies prefer to plan for the next quarter or year. This leads to minor improvements of 3% or 5%.

The liberating thing about future design is that companies can try on multiple futures. Each future design should be a fully rounded picture of what the company is doing, how it's operating, how it works with communities and the planet, and how shareholders benefit.

  • LaMarr was born in Austria to Jewish parents.
  • She married her first husband in 1934 at age 19. Unhappily married to a munitions manufacturer, she fled their home by bicycle.
  • In the lead up to WWI, she emigrated to the U.S.
  • In spite of her little English, LaMarr managed to win a lucrative contract to act in Hollywood films. She settled into life in Beverly Hills and socialized with, amongst others, John F. Kennedy and Howard Hughes, who provided her with equipment for her experiments.

LaMarr filed a patent with co-inventor George Antheil. It aimed to protect their war-time invention for radio communications to 'hop' from one frequency to another, preventing the Nazis from detecting the Allied torpedoes.

She never received any compensation for her ideas even though the U.S. military has publicly acknowledged her frequency-hopping patent and contribution to technology.

LaMarr's work as an inventor was barely publicized in the 1940s.

Historically, women have been positioned in the media with a one-dimensional framework created from a males perspective. Women were valued for their physicality, not for their ability to think or invent. LaMarr was beautiful and a brilliant inventor. Her entrepreneurial efforts to produce and direct films in the 1940s were also not encouraged. It has taken decades to give her credit for the inventor that she was.

Actress and inventor Hedy LaMarr

Hedy LaMarr is most known for her roles in the 1940s Oscar-nominated films 'Algiers' and 'Sampson and Delilah."

But her technical mind is really her greatest legacy. She filed a patent in 1941 for frequency-hopping technology that became a precursor to the secure wi-fi, GPS, and Bluetooth used by billions worldwide.

The 3 Components of Intrinsic Motivation
  • Autonomy: this is the desire to direct our own lives
  • Mastery: this is the impulse to get better and better at something that matters
  • Purpose: this is the longing to do what we do in the service of something larger than ourselves.

The assumption of Mastery is that people wish to get better at what they do as long as they care about it.

  • Engagement in the task one is pursuing is key to mastery.
  • To be engaged, you need to reach the state of flow, where goals are clear and feedback is immediate.
  • For flow, the challenge of a task must be just slightly above your level of competence.
  • Set “learning goals” instead of “performance goals”.
3 Types Of Motivation
  1. Motivation 1.0 - The survival instict: In this situation, the primary things that keep us alive (food, water, shelter) control our actions.
  2. Motivation 2.0 - The stick and the carrot: This system assume workers will have no desire to work unless they are offered an extrinsic reward ( this can mean a punishment too).
  3. Motivation 3.0 - Intrinsic reward: The internal satisfaction we feel from accomplishing something is far more rewarding than stick and carrot motivation.
  • They can extinguish intrinsic motivation.
  • They can diminish performance.
  • They can crush creativity.
  • They can crowd out good behavior.
  • They can encourage cheating, shortcuts, and unethical behavior.
  • They can become addictive.
  • They can foster short-term thinking.

The carrot and stick method does work, but it was created for a very different era and totally different circumstances.

Purpose leverage the human desire of being part of something bigger .

We reach purpose while:

  • Doing something that matters
  • Doing it well
  • Doing it in the service of a cause larger than ourselves.
  • Type X (Extrinsic): They are driven by external factors such as fame, status, money etc. They can often be highly successful but also troubled by an insatiable appetite for MORE.
  • Type I (Intrinsic): Their motivation comes from within – to accomplish something meaningful. Success is measured by the task itself and not by a reward. Type I’s will usually outperform a Type X in the long run.
  • Extrinsic motivation. Extrinsic motivators (a raise, a promotion, a bonus) do work they are usually doing so in the short-term only. If the motivator is taken away, the behavior stops.
  • Intrinsic motivation. It is the desire to do something for the internal satisfaction of it. It’s the joy we get from accomplishing something useful, the satisfaction of a job well done, a sense of purpose, pride, belonging.

Rewards usually offer a short-term boost. But the effect wears off, and the negative consequence of them remain: they reduce a person’s longer-term motivation to continue the project.

When money is used as an external reward for some activity, the subjects lose intrinsic interest for the activity.

It means having a choice in what you do and being-self driven.

People are naturally wired to be-self driven. When they have the freedom to pick what they work on (tasks), when they work on it (time), how they attain it (technique) and who they work with (team), they perform much better due to the sense of autonomy.

  • Consider the Person: think about their strengths and weaknesses and personal style. Think about how they act and the kinds of assignments they’ve handled.
  • Consider the Situation: Ask yourself whether the assignment might be dangerous for your team member, the company, or others.
  • Consider the Work: Make sure your team member has all the resources he or she needs to get the job done.
Authenticity has become a mark for leadership

An oversimplified understanding of what it means to be transparent can prevent your growth and limit your influence. When we feel out of our comfort zone, we can often use authenticity as an excuse for sticking with what's comfortable.

For example, a promotion into a leadership role can leave you feeling unsure of yourself. If you believe in superficial transparency, you may disclose all your insecurities to your company, and in the process, lose credibility with people.

Negative feedback given to leaders is often about style and not about their skills or expertise. Negative feedback can then feel like a threat to their ability.

However, if they rationalize their behaviour and think their style is unchangeable, it may eventually lead to their undoing.

Leadership growth usually means shifting from having good ideas to pitching them to diverse stakeholders. Inexperienced leaders, especially true-to-selfers, often find the process of getting buy-in artificial and political because they think their work should stand on its own merits.

Until we see growth as a way of extending our reach and increasing our impact, we will have trouble feeling authentic when expressing our strengths to influential people.

  • In trying to improve our game, a firm sense of self is a compass, but when we want to change our game, a too rigid self-concept can prevent us from moving forward.
  • In global business, we often work with people who don't share our cultural norms. They may have a different expectation for how we should behave than what feels authentic.
  • In today's world of connectivity, how we present ourselves is a critical aspect of leadership. We have to carefully curate a persona and that can clash with our private sense of self.

There are two ways in which leaders develop their personal styles:

  1. High self-monitors are naturally able to try on different styles until they find a good fit for themselves. They adapt to the demands of a situation without feeling fake. They care about managing their public image and may mask their vulnerability.
  2. True-to-selfers tend to express what they really think and feel, even when it is counter to situational demands. It may make people question their ability to do the job.

Without the benefit of an external perspective we get from experimenting with new leadership behaviours, habitual patterns of thought fence us in.

  • Learn from diverse role models. We should view authenticity not as an intrinsic state but instead as the ability to adopt elements you have learned from others' styles and behaviours.
  • Work on getting better. Setting goals for learning helps us experiment with our identities without feeling like a fraud. It motivates us to develop valued attributes.
  • Don't stick to who you are as a leader. Instead, embrace how your style changes over time and keep editing it.

© Brainstash, Inc

AboutCuratorsJobsPress KitTopicsTerms of ServicePrivacy PolicySitemap