Lynda  (@moody_moon) - Profile Photo

Lynda

@moody_moon

1.28K READS

Hello world! Just a curious mind that is always a beginner. Introvert INFP/INFJ (not sure yet =P). Obsessed with Dark Mode option . I'm into #mentalhealth, #personalgrowth, #coding, #videogames, #techworld

Nicaragua

someday

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Joined Jul 15, 2019

Writing is Thinking

What most people don’t realize is that it’s often not actually the writing that is difficult. It’s the thinking behind the writing.

“Writing is thinking. To write well is to think clearly. That's why it's so hard." - David McCullough

Writing is essentially a robust tool that enables us to clarify and communicate our thoughts. While writing, you are forcing yourself to think critically and exercise parts of your brain that are typically on auto-pilot.  As Einstein once said, “If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.”

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Do you know what makes people successful?

Experts claim that the most successful people aren’t necessarily the most intelligent or best educated; they’re the most emotionally resilient.

They don’t let negative emotions cloud their judgment. Instead, they acknowledge such feelings as being inevitable and take responsibility for their actions. They can step back from a situation and not allow their emotions to take over.

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Emotional Habits

Emotional Habits

by Akash Karia

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Procrastination is an emotion regulation problem, not a time management problem

Procrastination manifests from a failure to regulate negative emotions. This is your brain’s coping mechanism to protect you from a perceived threat in the present. 

Maybe you’re feeling anxious, bored, frustrated, resentful, or insecure about a pressing task, so you avoid confronting those negative emotions by, say, doing some housework instead.

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Why You Procrastinate (It Has Nothing to Do With Self-Control)

nytimes.com

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If you only do one thing, do this

Immediately after every lecture, meeting, or any significant experience, take 30 seconds -- no more, no less -- to write down the most important points.

I’ve been trying it out for a few months. Here’s what I’ve found so far:

It’s not note-taking: This exercise is an act of interpretation, prioritization, and decision-making.

It’s hard work: Deciding what’s most important is exhausting.

You learn to listen better and ask better questions. It changes the way you pay attention, whether listening to a talk or participating in a discussion.

You're able to help others more. Much of what makes the 30-second cut are observations about what matters to other people.

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The 30 Second Habit That Can Have a Big Impact On Your Life

huffpost.com

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Part I
  1. Stress + Rest = Growth. Decades of research in exercise science show that this is how you get stronger and faster, and the latest cognitive science shows that this is also how you get smarter and more creative.
  2. Focus on the Process, Not Results. Research shows that concentrating on the process is best for both performance and mental health. 
  3. Stay Humble. If you don’t maintain an open mind, you’ll severely limit your opportunities to learn and make progress.
  4. Build Your Tribe. A large and growing body of behavioral science research shows that motivation (or lack thereof) is contagious.

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The most important principles to grow your body and mind

getpocket.com

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