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The Five Purposes of Listening

https://leadershipfreak.blog/2018/03/13/the-five-purposes-of-listening/

leadershipfreak.blog

The Five Purposes of Listening
The most neglected work of leadership is listening. The reason? It's hard work. If leadership is about others, listening is about leadership. 4 reasons you hate to listen: A squirrel's attention span. Busy leaders look like squirrels caught in traffic. Dripping faucets. Nagging issues drip in the back of your mind.

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Stephen R. Covey

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The 5 Purposes Of Listening

  1. Listening makes people feel like they matter, which in turn makes them work harder.
  2. Arrogance talks. Humility listens. Practice humility by letting others speak.
  3. Listen to help others learn what they really think and find clarity.
  4. Listen to understand what needs to be acted upon.
  5. Curiosity. Listen to ask a question.

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4 Reasons You Hate To Listen

4 Reasons You Hate To Listen
  1. An attention span compromised by excess of stimulation.
  2. Nagging issues take over your mental space leaving little space for listening.
  3. Lack of empathy makes you ignore how other people feel when they are not heard.
  4. Conversational dominance and impatience.

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What Someone Closed to Listening Thinks

  • How does this impact me?
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  • What would I do about this?
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  • What do I need to tell?

5 Roadblocks To Listening

  1. Disinterest in connecting.
  2. Long-talkers and explainers who never get to the point!
  3. Knowledge. Talkers know.
  4. Distraction by what’s next.
  5. Multi-tasking.

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Everyday leadership begins with a passion and a mission. Ask yourself: “What am I passionate about? How can I turn that passion into a mission?”

Once you identify your pass...

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Try listening more than you speak. Listen to experts and fellow enthusiasts, including those with whom you disagree. Absorb their perspectives, insights, and experiences.

From listening to others, we can gather valuable insights from both their successes and their failings.

You have a voice. Share it

But remember that using your voice as an everyday leader comes with a responsibility.

When sharing your opinion—in-person or via social media—be clear, be concise, and be constructive. That is the best way to be heard.

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It means being actively curious about your blind spots. It’s not about lacking confidence, or self-esteem. It’s about entertaining the possibility that you may be wrong and being open to learning from the experience of others.

Why we need more intellectual humility

  1. Our culture promotes and rewards overconfidence and arrogance; 
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