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My Therapist Says Feelings Aren’t Facts

https://elemental.medium.com/my-therapist-says-feelings-arent-facts-d76510013e8e

elemental.medium.com

My Therapist Says Feelings Aren’t Facts
'I feel angry, I am not anger. I feel afraid. I am not my fear either.'

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A Feeling Of Unworthiness

A Feeling Of Unworthiness

Feelings of being unworthy and a burden on others can be common among people. It is usually a mixture of low self-esteem and introvertedness, coupled with a tendency to not express one’s feelings, ...

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Stop Identifying With Your Feelings

The error that we make is identifying ourselves with our emotions. We are by ourselves perfect, but we were never told this. Our feelings are not us. Our fear is a separate entity, which we can han...

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What Self-Reflection Is

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Is the process of thinking back on previous events and interpreting them through your experience. 

It’s about taking a step back and reflecting on your life, behavior and beliefs....

The Importance of Self-Reflection

  • It improve self-awareness.
  • It allows you to understand and see things from a different point of view. 
  • It allows you to respond, not react.
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  • It improves confidence.
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The Process of Self-Reflection

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History of existential therapy

  • Its origins go back to the existential philosophers of the 20th century, mainly to Jean-Paul Sartre, who declared in 1943 that we are “condemned to be free.”
  • Viktor Frankl wrote M...

Existential therapy has slowly been gaining recognition

In 2016, there were 136 existential-therapy institutions in 43 countries across six continents, and existential practitioners in at least 48 countries worldwide.

Recent studies show the benefits of using existential therapy for patients with advanced cancer, incarcerated individuals, and elderly people residing in nursing homes, among others; a number of meta-analyses have gathered data on its effectiveness.

What is existential therapy

Existential therapy concentrates on free will, self-determination, and the quest for meaning. It views experiences like as anxiety, alienation and depression as normal phases in the human development and maturation.

This process involves a philosophical examination of a person's experiences, emphasizing the person's freedom and responsibility to facilitate a higher degree of meaning and well-being in their life.