Ep 128: Sedentary Culture/Active Nature - Deepstash
Ep 128: Sedentary Culture/Active Nature

4 IDEAS

95 reads

Ep 128: Sedentary Culture/Active Nature

Keep reading for FREE

Changing a sedentary culture

Our bodies move all the time. Or, rather, we are loading our cells all the time, even when we are in a chair or bed at night. But many of our loads are static. We call the state of being loaded in one position for a long time sedentary. 

Sedentarism is an unintended consequence of other ways we identify our culture: like being“well developed” or “technologically progressive,” etc. 

4

31 reads

It's not about running

Everyone will have to think about ways to move more. For example, walking more can be a good program to improve your physical fitness levels.

Aim for 100 steps per minute. If you're just getting started, your fitness-making pace might be slower. On the other hand, if you're already used to walking at 100 steps per minute, you might need to walk faster.  

If you can't walk faster than 100 steps per minute, choose uphill or staired routes, or carry a load to challenge your fitness level. 

4

21 reads

"Sedentary culture" is currently part of the broader, overarching culture. But subcultures, including our individual culture, can also be sedentary. We would be moving more if society was set up to encourage or even require us to move more. 

However, the most immediate benefits can be found in changing our personal culture, which can grow into a dynamic family culture. For example, the whole family can sign up for a running race.  

3

26 reads

Measuring your steps per minute can be boring. One way to challenge your pace is to use a song's beats-per-minute (bpm) as your stepping-rate guide.

Beyonce’s "Crazy in Love" and Stevie Wonder's "Superstition" are 100 bpm songs. Try some 120 bpm songs for comparison, such as "I Wanna Dance With Somebody" by Whitney Houston, "Enter Sandman" by Metallica, or "Don’t Stop Believin'" by Journey.

Check your pace by humming a few bars to see how your steps measure out. Spotify has playlists that organise songs by bpm. 

4

17 reads

React

It's time to
Read like a Pro.

Jump-start your

reading habits

, gather your

knowledge

,

remember what you read

and stay ahead of the crowd!

Save time with daily digests

No ads, all content is free

Save ideas & add your own

Get access to the mobile app

2M+ Installs

4.7 App Rating