Pursuing happiness

We all say we want to be happy, but happiness is often out of our grasp. Maybe the problem is not so much with us, but with the concept of happiness.

A better concept is eudaimonia, which means 'good soul,' 'good spirit,' or 'good god.'

@kyronito

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Self Improvement

Unlike happiness, eudaimonia is not an emotion: It is a state of being or doing. It is more stable and cannot so quickly be taken away from us.

Eudaimonia is a much deeper and richer concept than happiness and is viewed in terms of living a worthwhile life. It has everything to do with hard work.

Socrates equated eudaimonia with wisdom and virtue, stating that he who is not wise cannot be happy.

Plato broadly agreed with Socrates. Plato writes that justice and injustice are to the soul as health and disease are to the body. For Plato, an unjust man cannot be happy because he is not in ordered control of himself.

For Aristotle, a thing is best understood at its end, purpose, or goal. The goal that is an end-in-itself is by understanding the unique function of a thing. Our unique function, says Aristotle, is our capacity to reason.

Thus, our supreme good is to develop our thinking skills, guard against lies, and train and master our emotions. In time, we will make better choices, do more meaningful things, and enjoy ever-increasing satisfaction from all we have become and done.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES

Aristotle in his many works has provided numerous interpretations of eudaimonia, explaining it as something reflecting the pursuit of virtue, excellence and the best within us. According to him, eudaimonia is a rational activity aimed at the pursuit of what is worthwhile in life.

Having an intention to be virtuous was an important factor for eudaimonia.

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IDEAS

One of the reasons why Stoicis...
One of the reasons why Stoicism is enjoying a revival today is that it gives concrete answers to moral questions.
Our Fixation With Happiness
  • Most of us actively try to build our lives around a constant state of happiness.
  • The problem is that very few people choose to do great things or want to make an effort to achieve something (which results in happiness).
  • Instead, most people simply rush towards attaining happiness, which they mistakenly assume will be a result of their avoiding unhappiness at all costs.
  • This neurotic, obsessive pursuit of happiness is what leads to problems like depression and listlessness (acedia).

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