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Knowledge as an Action

https://medium.com/s/more-to-that/from-ignorance-to-wisdom-a-framework-for-knowledge-b3e9a5e239c9

medium.com

Knowledge as an Action
If you learn something for the first time, does that make you knowledgeable? Or do you have to be an expert in that domain? Or perhaps it's somewhere near the middle? The problem with treating knowledge as concrete - as a noun-is that such an approach suggests there is a specific point at which what you know becomes an absolute truth.

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Knowledge exists on a barometer

Knowledge exists on a barometer
Continuously shifting depending on who you are talking to. Treating knowledge as concrete(a noun)  suggests there is a specific point at which what you know becomes an absolute truth. When knowledge becomes a process, a fluid verb instead of a concrete noun, our worldview changes.

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Knowing more about a subject <...
Knowing more about a subject doesn’t necessarily mean that you are right. We need to be able to measure the quality of information we possess.

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The Four Stages of Knowledge

The Four Stages of Knowledge
1. Increase the quality of your awareness to find the best seeds.

2. Cultivate curiosity to sprout and strengthen your roots.

3. Diligently mine information and build skill sets to grow your tree.

4. Produce and distribute seeds of your own to reiterate what you (think you) know.

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Attentional Capital (AC)

Attentional Capital (AC)
AC=a measurement used to calculate how we arrive at a place of knowledge.
  • A high AC: you have obtained your information through focused and objective research and would be open to changing your position if presented with sufficient evidence.
  • A low AC: you reactively believe whatever comes across your news feed and hold onto your beliefs in a dogmatic and tribal manner.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Self-Education

Real education comes to shape if we are respecting the importance of self-education, and not just happy being spoon-fed the pre-determined syllabus.

We need to expand our boundaries of imagin...

The Boundaries of Knowledge

We think non-fiction is more educational, but great fiction is possibly an even vaster vessel of wisdom. Imagination defines the boundaries of possibility and is far greater than mere knowledge.

Fictional stories tell us how the one-dimensional facts that we learn from history and science and philosophy mesh together.

The Edge of Your Knowledge

Jargon, prejudice, and even previous knowledge holds up our learning, locking us into one-dimensional thinking.

Clarity comes when we reach the edge of our understanding and play around there without fear.

Investigate fear factors

When we face our fear, to discover what it is and where it comes from, we can begin to heal. First, we must be gentle with ourselves as we transition from living with fear into managing it. 

Let go of victimhood

Living with fear and being the victim feels like a comfortable place because we’ve lived there for so long. 

But in reality, it's not a good place to be. Because anything is better than living with fear, the root of all of our inability to embrace opportunities and happiness.

The transition phase

Once we make it to the next level, where fear and victimhood no longer have power over us, we are in full transition.

This is where personal growth happens because this is where opportunities arise.

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Learning a second language

Research shows that children are proficient at learning a second language up until the age of 18, roughly ten years later than earlier estimates. It also shows that it is best to start another lang...

The decline in language learning

There are three possible reasons why the ability to learn a language decreases at 18.

  • Social changes: At 18, late teens typically graduate high school and may no longer have the time, opportunity or learning environment to study a second language.
  • Interference: The rules of a first language may interfere with the ability to learn a second language.
  • Continuing brain development: Changes in the brain that continue during the late teens and early 20s may make learning harder.

Learning a new language

There are many examples of people who pick up a language later in life. Our ability to learn new vocabulary appears to remain constant, but most of us will not be able to master grammar like a native speaker.