5 Scientific Tips for Getting Back to Sleep After You've Woken Up in the Middle of the Night - Deepstash

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5 Scientific Tips for Getting Back to Sleep After You've Woken Up in the Middle of the Night

http://mentalfloss.com/article/550396/expert-tips-for-getting-back-to-sleep

mentalfloss.com

5 Scientific Tips for Getting Back to Sleep After You've Woken Up in the Middle of the Night
Amid the whirl of the holiday season, many are vaguely aware of the approach of the winter solstice, but how much do you really know about it? Whether you're a fan of winter or just wish it would go away, here are 10 things to note-or even celebrate-about the solstice.

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Tips for Getting Back to Sleep

Tips for Getting Back to Sleep
  • Put the phone away: a big obstacle in your way is light.
  • Ignore the clock: it’s only add to your stress.
  • Don’t be afraid to get up: Do some stretching, light reading or a puzzle.
  • Engage in deep breathing exercises: in through your nose and out of your mouth in a rhythmic cycle.
  • Focus on what relaxes you: focus on mental images of what's most relaxing to you.

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The northern lights, or aurora borealis

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Ancient Origins of Halloween

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Your body needs dark too

Your body needs dark too

While we are starting to pay attention to how important sleep is, the need for dark is still mostly ignored.

Being exposed to regular patterns of light and dark regulates our circadian ...

Our sleep and wake patterns

On its own, the circadian rhythm takes almost 24 hours. Our bodies rely on the Sun to reset this cycle and keep it at 24 hours, the length of our days. Light and the dark are important signals for the cycle.

During the night, body temperature drops, metabolism slows, and the hormone melatonin rises dramatically. When the Sun comes up in the morning, melatonin has already started falling, and you wake up.

Our bodies in the dark

During the dark, levels of the hormone leptin (hunger control), go up. This means we do not feel hungry while low levels make us hungry.

Ans research found that sleep disruption and turning on lights lowers leptin levels which makes people hungry in the middle of the night.