The Benjamin Franklin Effect Mechanism

Some researchers think this effect comes from our need to reconcile us doing someone a favor and us not liking that person, so we assume that we like them. 

Other researchers think that the one being asked for help senses that the one asking wants to get friendly with them and in turn reciprocates the liking.

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The Benjamin Franklin Effect

A psychological phenomenon that causes people to like someone more after they do them a favor, especially if they dislike the helped person. 

You can use it to benefit and protect yourself when interacting with others.

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The Benjamin Franklin effect

Is a psychological phenomenon that causes us to like someone more after we do that person a favor: We justify our actions to ourselves, that we did them a favor because we liked them.

But the reverse effect is also true - we come to hate our victims, which helps to explain wartime atrocities.

Behind The Ben Franklin Effect

The effect works because our brains need to conciliate the fact that we are helping someone with our dislike for them, and the easiest way to do that is to assume we actually like them.

The request creates a contradiction and then discomfort for the person who dislikes you. And that pushes one to readjust their way of thinking. 

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