Connect with people

When you’re starting out working with your new colleagues, be yourself. Don’t put on an act. 

Show them you’re human and making some well-intended efforts to start off on the right foot so that all of your skills, knowledge, and expertise can be shared with increasing passion and confidence as you work together more.

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Joining A New Team

Having applied for the job, you probably know a good amount about the business anyway, but it often helps to do some more homework.  

Find out about the history, philosophy, and values that have built the company you’re now part of.

Immerse yourself

Really enjoy finding out everything you can about your new culture. 

Simply show your passion for working with your new team by finding out what it really means to be part of the team and the business.

In our eagerness to impress in a new role, it’s very common to set really unrealistic goals about how much we’re going to achieve in the first few months. 

Set some short term personal and work goals which will help to increase your confidence. 

Each morning before work ask yourself:

  • What do I want to find out about today?
  • How can I support my team today?
  • What strengths do I need to demonstrate today?
  • What demands will I be facing today?
  • What resources do I have available to deal with the demands?

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Remember Hanlon's Razor

Hanlon's razor refers to the idea that we should always assume ignorance before malice. This is especially important in situations where you're missing context.

If you're communicating via text with co-workers who are multiple time zones away, try to always assume ignorance before malice if you have a misunderstanding.

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IDEAS

Before you can formulate the correct course of action, you’ll need to learn all aspects of the business quickly. 

Sit in on as many calls and meetings as you can, and don’t be shy about doing so. Make sure that the team understands that you’re doing it for learning purposes only, so your actions aren’t misconstrued as micromanaging.

Communication challenges for remote teams
  • Body language. Even when we share the same space, the tone of a text or of an email is left wide open to interpretation and can generate anxiety.
  • The delay between our messages can often postpone or hide emotional reactions to our comments. Lacking an immediate response, we can become distracted, second-guess ourselves, or even grow frustrated with our teams.

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