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5 CEOs share their best productivity tips

https://www.fastcompany.com/40588089/5-ceos-share-their-best-productivity-tips

fastcompany.com

5 CEOs share their best productivity tips
Sallie Krawcheck, founder and CEO of Ellevest, a goal-based investing platform for women: I have spent a lot of time figuring out how I work best and when I'm most productive. I organize my day around that. I am most creative first thing in the morning and, somehow bizarrely, after I turn out the light at night.

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Keep your high-energy times open

Sallie Krawcheck, founder and CEO of Ellevest (a goal-based investing platform for women):

"I have spent a lot of time figuring out how I work best and when I’m most productive. I organize my day around that."

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Focus on the 5%

Bedros Keuilian, founder and CEO of Fit Body Boot Camp (group fitness training brand):

"Only 5% of the things I do are tasks that actually move the money needle, and those were the critical things that I needed to focus on 100% of the time. Everything else can be delegated to team members or subcontractors who have the skill sets and abilities to perform the job. This has been a game-changer for my business as we continue to have massive growth year after year."

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Eliminate interruptions

Dustin Moskovitz, CEO of Asana (productivity and project management platform):

"We practice “No Meeting Wednesdays” to ensure that everyone at the company gets a large block of time to focus on heads-down work without having to fit it in between meetings. This may be our most valuable cultural practice, and I encourage every company to consider adopting it. Additionally, we reflect frequently on whether our group activities are getting enough ROI to justify the interrupt and time expenditure. "

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Define the goal

Andrew Lansing, president and CEO of Levy Restaurants (food service and hospitality brand):

"I have found that these three steps can overcome any productivity hurdle: First, the entire team should identify what the true goal is for a project, and make sure everyone involved is focused on that goal. Second, we determine if there is a true finite ending, even if we can’t yet see what it is. Finally, we identify the various challenges standing in the way of achieving that ending and force ourselves to ignore anything that doesn’t help us overcome those challenges."

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Get ideas out of your head

Carl Dorvil, founder and CEO of GEX Managementn (professional employer organization):

I’ve identified someone whom I’ve worked with for a long time who knows me well. I regularly have brain drain sessions with her. 

Writing out what we’re discussing creates a linear map we can follow. Once the thoughts inside me get to the outside, she then helps me identify who on our team can pull weight and in what direction. It’s helped me see that I’m not alone and that we have resources other than myself to execute tasks.

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