Many people feel unable to find time in the day to do their most important work. Research reveals that on average, in an 8-hour day, employees are only productive for 3 hours.

  • Look at how you are spending your days. 
  • Examine the drains and incompletions that often leave you with little to no energy to complete the important work. 

@cristian510

Time Management

  • Drains are the tasks you have to do (commuting, personal admin, email correspondence, meetings, calls). These tasks drain your time and energy that you want to spend on priority work.
  • Incompletions are the items on your to-do list that you have not yet completed. They are related to work and personal items (responding to a simple email, or it can be a dream you keep putting off).

If you are spending your time, energy, and attention on tasks that don't support your overall goal or priorities, it's time to re-evaluate.

  • Set aside 20 minutes on your calendar and minimize distractions.
  • List all of your drains and incompletions. Write every last item you can think of, including the light bulb that needs replacing, and the conversation you need to have with a co-worker.

Determine what you can control and what you cannot. It is easy to feel overwhelmed, to worry and try to solve what you cannot control.

Now, cross off all of the items you have no control over. Commit to focus your energy on the things you can control.

Look at what is left on your drains and incompletions list. Consider if they are all items you do have control over. 

  • Tackle your incompletions list: delegate or outsource, identify if you’re missing a resource to complete the item and, if so, how you’ll find the resource(s) and put an end to perfectionism that causes you to wait until the “perfect” time.
  • Address the drains: set clear boundaries around what you are available for and when, change the way you use your time (i.e. find a way to make your commute more relaxing) and limit time spent on drains that can consume your day.

Addressing drains and incompletions can feel overwhelming at first, especially if you already feel tired.

Take action to see results. A short-term investment in completing this task will give you a long-term reward that will dramatically improve your workflow and energy.

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

SIMILAR ARTICLES

Multitasking

Ringing phones, text messages, reminders, pop-ups, social media, email.

There’re countless studies demonstrating that multitasking will hinder your work both in terms of quality and quantity. 

Resist the temptation to get in the loop and do one thing at a time.

7

IDEAS

Myth #1: Multitasking Makes You Efficient

While multitasking your brain needs to do goal shifting and rule activation (turning off rules for one task and turning on rules for another).

Switching tasks always carries a cost in terms of time and mental energy. And although the cost in time is short we switch so often that it stacks up and can consume up to 40% of your time.

  • Courage is in choosing to work less because we are confident in our own productivity time, even if that means having a 5-hour workday.
  • It is having a difficult conversation with someone at work.

© Brainstash, Inc

AboutCuratorsJobsPress KitTopicsTerms of ServicePrivacy PolicySitemap