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How to Be Mindful When Running

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/06/well/mind/how-to-be-mindful-when-running.html

nytimes.com

How to Be Mindful When Running
When we reconnect to the world with our feet, we can experience a powerful shift in mental and emotional states.

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William Pullen

"Movement is medicine. When we reconnect to the world with our feet, we can experience a powerful shift in mental and emotional states. Deeply therapeutic, mindful running simply offers a return to the real world from which we so often find ourselves adrift."

William Pullen

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How To Be Mindful While Running

  1. Once you get moving, find a comfortable pace.
  2. Become aware of the weather, the surroundings, colors, smells and shapes that pass you by as you move.
  3. Be mindful of your intention to run with awareness and count your steps if possible.
  4. If a thought hijacks your mind, return back gently to counting your steps.
  5. Become aware of your recurring thought.
  6. Try to get in a zone where thoughts cease to exist, even the runner is no more and only the running remains.

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