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The 8th Habit Of Highly Effective People

https://www.forbes.com/sites/bryanrobinson/2019/07/07/the-8th-habit-of-highly-effective-people/

forbes.com

The 8th Habit Of Highly Effective People
It has been seven years to the month since the death of Stephen Covey, author of the classic book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. Covey's main contribution was the quantitative, two-by-two matrix he created.

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The Eighth Qualitative Habit

The Eighth Qualitative Habit

It's related to your ability to act instead of reacting when things don’t go your way.

Your reactivity impacts your attitude, performance, effectiveness and how others perceive you.

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Act instead of reacting

The real distress from an unpleasant situation comes from the reaction to the situation, not from the initial event itself.

If you can avoid reacting when uncontrollable events happen, you can reduce your stress and improve your effectiveness and well-being. 

Hold your reaction and observe the situation with curiosity from a bird's eye view.

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Practicing Self-Regulation

Self-Regulation is the ability to stay calm and collected in the middle of a distressing situation.

Develop the skill to see the initial situation and your reaction to it separately. Self-regulation (self-calming) helps you recognize your emotions and not to react based on your emotions.

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Be Proactive

Reactive people believe the world is happening to them. They focus on things that are in their circle of concern, but not in their circle of influence.

Proactive people recognize th...

Begin with the End in Mind

Start with a clear destination to determine your steps. Identify your values and live by them.

  • Visualize in detail your own funeral. What are they saying about how you lived your life, and your relationships? What do you want them to say? Change your priorities accordingly.
  • Break down different roles in your life - whether professional, personal or in a community. List 3-5 goals you want to achieve for each. 
  • Define what scares you and write down exactly how you'll handle it.

Go after your goals

Prioritize your day-to-day actions based on what is most important, not what is most urgent.

Be disciplined to follow these actions regardless of how you feel at any given moment. Maintain a primary focus on relationships and results, and a secondary focus on time.

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Time management matrix

Time management matrix

At the beginning of every week, write a two-by-two matrix on a blank sheet of paper.

One side of the matrix says "urgent" and "not urgent".  The other side of the matrix says "important"...

Quadrant 1: Urgent-Important

These are the most pressing tasks we'll likely get to this week.  When we do fire-fighting, it's all relating to stuff in this quadrant.

Quadrant 2: Not Urgent - Important

These are the things that matter in the long-term but will offer no concrete benefits right now or even this year. They are things we know we need to get to but probably will push off. 

Take Stock and Track Your Time

You can’t really clean up your schedule if you don’t know what’s in it—and that includes all the things on your literal and official calendar and all the things that aren’t. 

Purge Recurring Meetings and Tasks

Once you know what’s on your calendar, ask yourself: “What is the purpose of each thing on here? Are we accomplishing that or does something need to change?” 

Question each task. Start with recurring meetings, which can very easily build up and take over your calendar.

Sort Things By Importance and Urgency

... and put them in one of four quadrants:

  • Quadrant I: Important, Urgent (crises, last-minute meetings for important deadlines)
  • Quadrant II: Important, Not Urgent (strategic planning, long-term goal setting)
  • Quadrant III: Not Important, Urgent (certain emails, phone calls, meetings, and events)
  • Quadrant IV: Not Important, Not Urgent (scrolling mindlessly through social media, binge-watching TV you don’t really care about).