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Cal Newport on why you should *not* follow your passion

https://www.bakadesuyo.com/2013/04/interview-author-cal-newport-on-how-you-can-become-an-expert-and-why-you-should-not-follow-your-passion/

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Cal Newport on why you should *not* follow your passion
Cal Newport holds a PhD from MIT and is an assistant professor of Computer Science at Georgetown University. He runs the popular blog Study Hacks (which I highly recommend) and is the author of four books including, most recently, So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love.

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Growth happens outside of your control area

Growth happens outside of your control area

When people want to get better at something they make a mistake by seeking flow: It’s enjoyable, you feel like you have control. But the actual state in which you’re getting better is one of where you feel uncomfortable.  

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For lasting success, abandon the passion mindset for the craftsman's mindset

For lasting success, abandon the passion mindset for the craftsman's mindset

The passion mindset asks “What does this job offer me?".The craftsman's mindset finds joy in developing news skills and then puts them to work, by asking “What am I offering the world?

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In an unorthodox approach, Georgetown University professor Cal Newport debunks the long-held belief that "follow your passion" is good advice, and sets out on a quest to discover the reality of how people end up loving their careers. Not only are pre-existing passions rare and have little to do with how most people end up loving their work, but a focus on passion over skill can be dangerous, leading to anxiety and chronic job hopping. Spending time with organic farmers, venture capitalists, screenwriters, freelance computer programmers, and others who admitted to deriving great satisfaction from their work, Newport uncovers the strategies they used and the pitfalls they avoided in developing their compelling careers. Cal reveals that matching your job to a pre-existing passion does not matter. Passion comes after you put in the hard work to become excellent at something valuable, not before. In other words, what you do for a living is much less important than how you do it. With a title taken from the comedian Steve Martin, who once said his advice for aspiring entertainers was to "be so good they can't ignore you," Cal Newport's clearly written manifesto is mandatory reading for anyone fretting about what to do with their life, or frustrated by their current job situation and eager to find a fresh new way to take control of their livelihood. He provides an evidence-based blueprint for creating work you love, and will change the way you think about careers, happiness, and the crafting of a remarkable life.

"Follow your passions" is bad advice

"Follow your passions" is bad advice

Few people have a passion that neatly translates into a career, and following one's passions often leads to misguided career moves. Rather, your satisfaction at work has more t...

Think about what you can offer the world

  • A "passion mindset" focuses on what the world can offer to you - what perfect job can you find to fit your passions? This often leads to confusion and wandering from job to job.
  • A "craftsman mindset" focuses on what you can offer the world in whatever position you are in and offers clarity.

To get a great job you have to offer something great

A job that satisfies the ingredients of intrinsic motivation is rare and valuable, so you need to develop rare and valuable skills to offer in exchange.

Career capital = the value of competencies, knowledge and individual personality attributes you have to produce economic value." (LinkedIn)

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Digital minimalism

Digital minimalism

It means using technology with more intention and purpose.

It's a “philosophy of technology use” rooted in reclaiming control and intention back from the devices and platforms that hav...

Techno-maximalism

It promtes the basic idea that technological innovations can bring value and convenience into your life.

It just looks at the positives. And it's view is more is better than less, because more things that bring you benefits means more total benefits. 

Putting FOMO into perspective

If you want to maximize the amount of value you feel in your life, you want to put as much of your time and effort as possible into the small number of things to give you huge rewards. 

When you think about it that way, fear of missing out looks like, just mathematically speaking, a really bad strategy.

“Follow your passion” might be bad advice

  • “Follow your passion” is frustratingly meaningless if, like many people, you don’t have a passion to follow.

  • We don’t have much evidence that matching your job to a p...