Swearing Is Good For You-And Chimps Do It, Too - Deepstash

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Swearing Is Good For You-And Chimps Do It, Too

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2018/01/science-swearing-profanity-curse-emma-byrne/

nationalgeographic.com

Swearing Is Good For You-And Chimps Do It, Too
Swearing is usually regarded as simply lazy language or an abusive lapse in civility. But as Emma Byrne shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad Language , new research reveals that profanity has many positive virtues, from promoting trust and teamwork in the office to increasing our tolerance to pain.

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Swearing

Swearing is usually regarded as simply lazy language or an abusive lapse in civility.

New research reveals that profanity has many positive virtues, from promoting trust and teamwork in the office to increasing our tolerance to pain.

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Swearing has an emotional impact

There’s great research coming out that says that jocular abuse, particularly swearing among friends, is a strong signal of the degree of trust that those friends share.

You’re demonstrating that you have a sophisticated theory of mind about the person that you’re talking to and that you understand their mental model.

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Women swear just as much as men

Attitudinal surveys show that both men and women tend to judge women’s swearing much more harshly.

For example, when women with breast cancer or arthritis swear as a result of their condition, they’re much more likely to lose friends, particularly female friends. Whereas men who swear about conditions like testicular cancer tend to bond more closely with other men using the same vocabulary.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

It lessens pain

An experiment repeated many times has consistently shown that swearing makes you able to withstand discomfort better.

Using curse words causes actual physiological changes in your body...

It helps avoid violence

It can be a seriously bad idea to let loose and throw a punch at someone who's made us angry.

We use swear words, to let profanity stand in for aggressive action.

You can achieve more

Swearing engages both sides of your brain.

This may be why people who have trouble speaking, such as stroke victims or stutterers, are often able to speak more easily when they curse.

Swear words

By definition, swear words are offensive. If a word, over time, ceases to be offensive, then it falls out of use as a swear word.

We will often use swear words to vent some emotion. Swearing al...

Swearing benefits

  • Swearing helps mitigate pain.
  • Those who speak more than one language, report that swearing in their first language carries a bigger emotional punch.
  • A few blue words, uttered in a good-natured way, indicates and encourages intimacy.
  • A recent study suggests that people who swear are perceived as more trustworthy.

Common errors when reading people

  • Ignoring context: Crossed arms don’t mean much if the room is cold or the chair they’re sitting in doesn’t have armrests. 
  • Not looking for clusters: It’s a consisten...

Trusting your instincts

Your first impressions are usually pretty accurate. But whether they are wrong or right, first impressions affect us in a big way and we are slow to change them.

You have to be willing to update them quite rapidly. 

Reading first impressions

  • Studies show that if someone seems extroverted, confident, religious or conscientious, they probably are.
  • We all pay more attention to pretty people, and so we tend to take the time to evaluate them.
  • If you want to know if someone is good at their job, watch them do it for 30-60 seconds. 
  • Funny people are smart: Effective humor production acts as an honest indicator of intelligence in humans.

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