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Why your brain never runs out of problems to find

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20180710-why-the-brain-always-finds-new-problems-and-threats

bbc.com

Why your brain never runs out of problems to find
Why do many problems in life seem to stubbornly stick around - no matter how hard people work to fix them? It turns out that a quirk in the way human brains process information means that when something becomes rare, we sometimes see it in more places than ever.

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Concept creep

Concept creep

... or moving the goalposts, it happens when problems never seem to go away because people keep changing how they define them.

This can be a frustrating experience, because you don't really know if you’re making progress solving a problem, when you keep redefining what it means to solve it.

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Relative comparisons

Relative comparisons

These comparisons often use less energy than absolute measurements. For e.g, it’s easier to remember which of your cousins is the tallest than exactly how tall each cousin is. Human brains have likely evolved to use relative comparisons in many situations because they often provide enough information to safely navigate our environments, with very little effort.

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