Peak-End Rule: Why You Make Terrible Life Choices - Deepstash

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Peak-End Rule: Why You Make Terrible Life Choices

https://medium.com/behavior-design/peak-end-rule-why-you-make-terrible-life-choices-45e5fa73cbc8#

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Peak-End Rule: Why You Make Terrible Life Choices
It's New Year's Eve. There I am on the dance floor - it's teeming with people and there's hardly space to breathe. Loud thumping music pierces my eardrums and I have no idea where my friends are. Then, the guy next to me takes a misstep, spills an entire cup of beer down my shoulder.

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The peak-end rule

The peak-end rule

Is a cognitive bias that impacts how people remember past events. 

We don’t remember experiences accurately. Rather, we tend to recall the highlights and how things end. This applies for both positive and negatives experiences.

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Taking advantage of the Peak-end rule

Taking advantage of the Peak-end rule
  • End on a high note: to make better memories, always consider how you will end an experience.
  • More peaks, more memories: getting out there, even if it hurts, can create lasting memories if it leads to an intense payoff. 
  • Small bursts will do: we don’t need an experience to be long to make a positive memory.

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