How Not to Care When People Don't Like You - Deepstash

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How Not to Care When People Don't Like You

https://lifehacker.com/how-not-to-care-when-people-dont-like-you-1823964733

lifehacker.com

How Not to Care When People Don't Like You
When I was in high school, I found out that my friends didn't like me. One of the girls in my "group" told me I wasn't invited to a birthday party because "everyone" thought I was annoying-which, to be honest, at 15 I probably was-and for months I was ostracized.

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Rejection is normal

It's impossible to please everyone. And rejection is a way to figure out who’s compatible with whom: getting axed from a social group gives you space to find folks that are a little ...

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It’s okay to feel pain

When we get rejected, our brains register an emotional chemical response so strong, it can physically hurt. 

We go through almost the same stages as if we were grieving (self-blam...

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It’s not (totally) your fault

Rejection is personal, and it’s easy to start questioning your self-worth when someone makes it clear they don’t like you. 

But for the most part, being disliked is a matter of mutual...

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Be aware of your bad behavior

While you shouldn’t always blame yourself if someone doesn’t like you, if you’re finding this is a pattern, you may want to take an objective look at your own behavior.

One way to find...

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The people that do like you

Spending time with people that care about you can boost your self-esteem and help you to feel more secure.

Being with people who appreciate you will be in the long run a much more fulf...

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Popular people are genuinely interested in other people, actively learn more about them, and look for connections. 

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Popular people have worked at and mastered this.

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As the Buddhist meditation practice has morphed into a billion-dollar industry, it’s become the go-to solution for everything from depression to weight gain. 

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Modern Mindfulness

Mindfulness as a practice today is loosely based on the Buddhist concept of Sati, as described in the Buddhist text the Four Foundations of Mindfulness. But there isn’t a single word in the text that translates to “now” or “present,” which is central to its modern application.

What has remained consistent is the use of meditation in pursuit of greater self-awareness, coupled with a rejection of the egocentric mode of existence. 

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For example, the idea that you should just reject your whole core and all your impulses, may be seen as a formula for depression and anxiety.

Self-Made Millennials

Millennials who claim to be ‘self-made’ get support from their parents and in some cases, enjoy the privilege too, but are reluctant to admit the same. They have to show the world that they are able to do well and sustain themselves on their own, and any conversation around money, privilege, success and class stirs up topics they may try to avoid.


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