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This simple negotiation tactic brought 195 countries to consensus

https://qz.com/572623/this-simple-negotiation-tactic-brought-195-countries-to-consensus-in-the-paris-climate-talks/

qz.com

This simple negotiation tactic brought 195 countries to consensus
Negotiations are difficult by nature. Managing negotiations between 195 countries in order to arrive at a legally binding agreement, on the other hand, is nearly impossible. This was the problem that United Nations officials faced over two weeks at this month's climate-change summit in Paris. To solve it, they brought in a unique management strategy.

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Is used to simplify discussions between many parties and is designed to allow every party to voice its opinion, but still arrive at a consensus quickly. 

Instead of repeating stated positions, each party is encouraged to speak personally and state their “red lines,” which are thresholds that they don’t want to cross. But while telling others their hard limits, they are also asked to provide solutions to find a common ground

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