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Choice Minimalism: Why Mark Zuckerberg Wears the Same Thing Every Day

https://medium.com/startup-grind/choice-minimalism-why-mark-zuckerberg-wears-the-same-thing-every-day-2f132f1b5706

medium.com

Choice Minimalism: Why Mark Zuckerberg Wears the Same Thing Every Day
Take a peek inside Mark Zuckerberg's closet: It's all gray T-shirts... How strange. Is he a nutcase? But it's not just Zuck. Here's Obama's outfit of choice: He always wears a gray or blue suit with a blue-ish tie. Same thing with Ray Dalio, manager of Bridgewater Associates one of the most successful hedge funds in history ($122 Billion under management).

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Choice minimalism

  • Simplify the wardrobe. We tend to wear the same 10–20% of our wardrobes for 80%+ of the time.
  • Eat the same few meals.
  • Design a morning routine and save your willpower for important decisions later in the day.
  • Shop the periphery. The unhealthy stuff is built into the center, so stay on outskirts: there are fewer options AND it’s healthier.
  • Set “key objectives” before bed to saves time in the morning when you want to jump right into doing focused work.

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Do a self-diagnostic

  • Track decisions. Spend a week tracking all the choices you make in a day.
  • Evaluate effectiveness. Review your notes and group decisions by category. Then ask, “Does this decision affect my desired outcomes?” Many of them won’t.
  • Do a Pareto analysis. Ask, “What are the 20% or fewer useless decisions that are taking up 80% or more of my time?” Those are the ones to tackle first.

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Think in Years, Not Days

Before jumping to a conclusion, think about the long-term consequences of your decision.

We may respect those able to fling themselves into a hard problem and make a quick choice with seemingly little thought, but making a meaningful decision needs to be done with care for the long-term effects.

Understand Decision Fatigue

It’s important to be aware of what state of mind you’re in before tackling a hard choice.

Decision fatigue happens when the mental energy required to weigh the tradeoffs of our decision becomes too much for us to handle. 

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Trim the fat

Multitasking and directing your energy to unimportant tasks and activities will overwhelm and prevent you from being productive.

Focus on your 3 to 5 ...

Measure your results

To assist you with measuring results instead of time, keep done lists to feel more motivated and focused.

Have an attitude adjustment

We are more effective at work when we have a positive attitude. 

good attitude at work will help you set standards for your work and ensure that you're taking responsibility for yourself.

Decision fatigue

As you make more decisions (especially difficult ones), and as you consider more options, you start to get mentally tired making your subsequent decisions worse and more difficult.

Fewer options and decision making

We assume more options will make us happier, but that's not true.

By strategically decreasing the number of decisions we need to make we're making sure we actually choose something, and we can save our decisiveness for when it really counts.

Rules

A rule is a predetermined response to a given situation, a set action for how you’ll handle a common situation so that you don’t waste any time trying to decide between two or more small and unimportant options.

Examples: "I Never answer calls from unrecognized numbers" or "I don’t check email before 10 am, after 7 pm, or on Saturday."