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You're Apologizing All Wrong. Here's How To Say Sorry The Right Way : Life Kit

You're Apologizing All Wrong. Here's How To Say Sorry The Right Way : Life Kit

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Drop your defences

Drop your defences

  • We listen for what we don't agree with, so we can defend ourselves and correct the facts.
  • Keep an open mind and listen with an explicit intention to understand the other person.
  • Try to wrap your brain around the essence of what that hurt party needs you to get.

A good apology

A good apology

  • A good apology is an opportunity for us to take clear and direct responsibility for our wrongdoing
  • We shouldn’t blame, evade, make excuses or bring up the past.
  • A good apology brims with accountability, meets the moment, and can transform our relationships.

Good apology or No apology

Good apology or No apology

  • Most of us haven't been taught how to apologise
  • Our efforts tend to be harmful: vague, intrusive, demanding, or full of warnings that can leave the recipient of an apology feeling even worse.
  • When the apology is absent or it's a bad apology, it puts a crack in the very foundation of a relationship and can even end it.
  • That's why it is critical to get an apology right.

Stay Focused

Stay Focused

  • Your attention when apologizing should be on the impact of your words or deeds, not on your intention.
  • Zero in on the situation at hand and stay attuned to the needs of the person who is hurting.
  • It's not the two words 'I'm sorry' that heal the injury. The hurt party wants to know that we really get it, that we validate their feelings and care.

Remember: A good apology is a beginning, not an end.

Remember: A good apology is a beginning, not an end.

  • An apology isn't the only chance you ever get to address the underlying issue. The apology is the chance you get to establish the ground for future communication.
  • An apology creates an opening. When done with attention and care, it can be a conduit for greater understanding and deeper connection.

Less is more

Less is more

  • Keep your apology short and mind the histrionics.
  • Over-apologising is not only irritating — it disrupts the flow of the conversation and shifts the focus away from the person who needs to be attended to
  • You've hijacked the hurt party's emotionality and made the apology about you.

Be real.

Be real.

  • Show genuine sorrow and remorse.
  • It feels vulnerable to not be in control of the outcome, but it is also courageous.

No ifs or buts

No ifs or buts

  • A sincere apology does not include caveats or qualifiers.
  • 'But' almost always signifies a rationalisation, a criticism, or an excuse
  • It doesn't matter if what you say after the 'but' is true, the 'but' makes your apology false.

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