4. Imagine the worst - Deepstash

4. Imagine the worst

Try imagining the worst thing that can happen – perhaps it's panicking and having a heart attack. Then try to think yourself into having a heart attack. It's just not possible. The fear will run away the more you chase it.

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Sharing fears takes away a lot of their scariness. If you can't talk to a partner, friend or family member, call a helpline such as Breathing Space on 0800 83 85 87 or Samaritans on 116 123.

You could also try a Cognitive Behavioural Therapy approach over the telephone, with a service such as NHS Living Life. If you would like to find out more about this appointment-based service, you can visit the Living Life website or phone 0800 328 9655 (Mon to Fri, 1pm to 9pm).​

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It sometimes helps to challenge fearful thoughts. For example, if you're scared of getting trapped in a lift and suffocating, ask yourself if you have ever heard of this happening to someone. Ask yourself what you would say to a friend who had a similar fear.

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Take a moment to close your eyes and imagine a place of safety and calm. It could be a picture of you walking on a beautiful beach, or snuggled up in bed with the cat next to you, or a happy memory from childhood. Let the positive feelings soothe you until you feel more relaxed.

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Life is full of stresses, yet many of us feel that our lives must be perfect. Bad days and setbacks will always happen, and it's important to remember that life is messy.

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It's impossible to think clearly when you're flooded with fear or anxiety. The first thing to do is take time out so you can physically calm down.

Distract yourself from the worry for 15 minutes by walking around the block, making a cup of tea or having a bath.

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If you start to get a faster heartbeat or sweating palms, the best thing is not to fight it.

Stay where you are and simply feel the panic without trying to distract yourself. Place the palm of your hand on your stomach and breathe slowly and deeply.

The goal is to help the mind get used to coping with panic, which takes the fear of fear away.

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Finally, give yourself a treat. When you've made that call you've been dreading, for example, reinforce your success by treating yourself to a massage, a country walk, a meal out, a book, a DVD, or whatever little gift makes you happy.

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Avoiding fears only makes them scarier. Whatever your fear, if you face it, it should start to fade. If you panic one day getting into a lift, for example, it's best to get back into a lift the next day.

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Lots of people turn to alcohol or drugs to self-treat anxiety, but this will only make matters worse. Simple, everyday things like a good night's sleep, a wholesome meal and a walk are often the best cures for anxiety.

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Overcome from your biggest fear
  1. Allow yourself to sit with your fear for 2-3 minutes at a time. ...
  2. Write down the things you are grateful for. ...
  3. Remind yourself that your anxiety is a storehouse of wisdom. ...
  4. Exercise. ...
  5. Use humor to deflate your worst fears. ...
  6. Appreciate your courage.
  7. Learn to accept

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Mindfulness is all the rage for multiple reasons. This practice helps you halt future fears and ruminations about an immutable past and live in the present moment.

Mindfulness can help you find inner peace with the transient nature of life. You might develop an unshakable spiritual belief system fueled by wisdom arising from deep within your soul. Conversely, you might make peace with the idea that this life is all there is and decide to make the most of it. By coming to terms with the reality of the limited human lifespan, you can spend more of it living and less of it worrying.

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Dental Phobia

Dental phobia is real. Why the fear of the dentist?

People are anxious about dental visits for different reasons.

Some anticipate pain. Others worry that the dentist might be rushed or neglect their concerns. Additional stressors include negative memories of past experiences and even the sterile smell of the dental office. Sometimes, simply interrupting the normal day's routine for a dentist visit creates anxiety.

If unaddressed, dental anxiety can lead to future oral health problems

If you’re nervous about an upcoming dental visit, try these ways to curb your anxiety:

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