Theories with no facts :conspiracy theories.

Theories with no facts :conspiracy theories.

  • A conspiracy theory can be defined as the belief that there are groups that meet in secret to plan and carry out malevolent goals.
  • Conspiracy theories are not a new phenomenon, but they seem to have risen to the forefront of consciousness in recent years.
  • it might seem like these beliefs are rare or even pathological, research has shown that they are surprisingly common.

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Why Do People Believe in Conspiracy Theories?

verywellmind.com

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Effects of conspiracy theories in our lives.
  • One study found that people who feel psychologically and sociopolitically disempowered are more likely to believe in conspiracy theories.8
  • Another study found that people are also more likely to believe in conspiracies when they are experiencing anxiety.
  • In fact, by believing in these theories, people may actually be less likely to engage in actions that would potentially boost their sense of control (such as voting or participating in political activity).

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Reason behind these beliefs.
  • Researchers suggest that there are a number of different reasons why people believe in conspiracy theories.
  • Key reasons:A need for understanding and consistency (epistemic)6
  • A need for control (existential)
  • A need to belong or feel special (social).
  • Having lower analytical abilities and less tolerance for uncertainty also play a role.

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Conspiracy Theories

In the earlier times, conspiracy theories were a convenient way to cover up the inadequacies of the government, and putting a set of helpless people as a scapegoat, cloaking the misdeeds or mismanagement of those holding the ranks.

In 331 B.C., an epidemic was hidden in Rome, using a false story of mass poisoning by some women. Even now, in the current 2020 pandemic there are conspiracy theories doing the rounds, like a virus disease being spread by the telecommunications industry.

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What we can learn from conspiracy theories

bbc.com

The Psychology Behind Conspiracy Theories

When people feel threatened and out of control, it’s natural to want to feel more control and bring order to the randomness . Some people resort to conspiracy theories to feel in control.

Experts say that by stepping back and evaluating what makes these theories seem plausible to certain people, we can engage in a more productive dialogue.

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The Psychology Behind Conspiracy Theories

healthline.com

Epistemic justification

There is a branch of philosophy concerned specifically with how we justify our beliefs. The chief concern of "epistemic justification" is determining what counts as a good reason for believing something and how we come about those reasons. While there is a smorgasbord of different theories, one of the bigger is known as "coherentism."

Coherentism is a view that settles for circular reasoning. It does so knowingly because the alternatives are just as bad, if not worse.

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Your beliefs are much harder to justify than you think

bigthink.com