Accept and Acknowledge Personality Differences

Small tics will be magnified and personality differences lead to varying work styles, which can easily turn into conflict.

Conflict can even arise from something as simple as you desiring a quiet lunch period, while your coworkers like to socialize. These types of things are simply differences in how you work or socialize, and don’t necessarily make your coworkers bad.

@eme_gz71

🗂

Career

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

Conflict with bad coworkers

Having a bad coworker can really hamper your mood over the long haul, as well as your job performance. 

How you deal with that conflict could very well be the difference between having a good job and having a bad job.

Some work cultures are notoriously demanding and competitive, which can obviously lead to a lot of conflict.

In a sales environment where folks are competing for commissions and bonuses, it’s understandable that not everyone would be over-the-top friendly with each other. You should consider whether you might be misinterpreting behavior or overreacting to it.

Most conflict arises because people's egos are threatened. Our work is directly connected to our livelihood; if it’s threatened, we’re likely to lash out.

Try to be kind. Your kindness may very well help them realize and be a little ashamed of their own poor behavior, and the situation may not have to escalate to a point of even needing to confront it.

  • Move desks/cubicles. If you’ve got a cubicle neighbor who’s annoying you, move desks.
  • Rearrange your schedule. Maybe you can shift your entire workday by an hour or two.
  • Ask about working remotely, from home a couple days per week, or even simply in a nearby coffee shop.
  • Change teams. This tactic is a little more extreme, as it could functionally mean changing your job

Especially if your conflict with a coworker is personal in nature rather than related to the work itself, you may need to approach them directly with whatever your issue is. 

In most cases, people aren’t malicious, and they’ll respect your direct approach.

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEAS

Always Give A "Why"

Your team members need to know that they are part of a larger purpose. They need to know that whatever task they're doing ties into the larger company goals. 

They need to know that their work matters. If you believe that a motivated and happy employee is a better employee, then take the time to explain to them why you are asking them to do something, rather than just asking them to do something. 

7

IDEAS

Awkward Work Scenarios
  1. Others taking credit for your work: speak up when presenting your joint ideas, else the boss will remember that the other was the one who did all the talking.
  2. Overanalyzing your tone or watering down criticism: understand the difference between sounding arrogant and assertive.
  3. Noisy coworkers: work somewhere else in the office or record the noises that you make during a workday—maybe the noises aren’t as bad as you think.
  4. Beign interrupted during meetings: to speak with authority and presence you need to feel worth listening to, and you can develop it for yourself.
  5. Making friends in the office: invite a coworker to lunch or ask to join a group of them. People are often happy to have new additions.
  6. Firing a hard worker that isn’t good enough: set clear benchmarks, and let them know what will happen if they don’t meet them.
  7. You want to leave early but others work late: talk to your boss if there is no reason for the extra time.
  8. Your employees don’t respect you: project confidence in your new role, then be specific and clear about your expectations.
  9. Interviewing while pregnant: it’s an opportunity to show your resourcefulness and preparation. Be ready with a plan for minimizing the impact of your absence.
  10. You don't want to attend to happy hour: try coming up with some time during work to bond–like lunch or family-friendly weekend events.
  • You probably show up late for meetings so that you don't have to engage in small talk. Instead, try to arrive early for meetings so that you can meet people as they arrive.
  • Remember that others may also feel uncomfortable about speaking up. They are also nervous about voicing their opinion. They will be relieved if you speak up first.
  • Examine the thoughts you have while in a meeting. Ask if the thoughts are helpful and realistic.

© Brainstash, Inc

AboutCuratorsJobsPress KitTerms of ServicePrivacy PolicySitemap