Inform Your Face - Deepstash

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Tough Love: How Not to Bore an Audience

Inform Your Face

When you're speaking, if you're having a good time, inform your face. Your face is the most valuable real estate in any meeting room.

The audience wants to hear, see, and sense your face enjoying your belief in your clear and simple message. When they do, you and your ideas will be more convincing.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Engage your Audience
Engage your Audience
  • Ask questions.
  • Ask to introduce themselves.
  • Do a paper or online survey.
  • Ask them during the presentation.
  • Create a "Round ...
Improve your Presentation
  • Welcome humor that happens.
  • Enliven your slides with pictures you have taken of people, product, or locations.
  • Insert short video clips to hear from significant people.
  • Tell a story to illustrate your points.
  • Format your presentation like a story with a problem and solution.
  • Use slides only as a backup; the audience and you come before the slides.
You don’t care enough about the audience

Most people think they are the most important player in a presentation. They are wrong. The audience, the listeners, the people watching the presenter are the most important players.

The Words and the Design

The work on the presentation slides should be clear, crisp, concise, with fewer words and more visually striking simple imagery.

Long sentences and tiny words going through the whole slide are not advisable.

Lack of Practice

Invest your time practicing thoughtfully and getting in a zone where you are a natural.

An effortless-looking presentation makes the audience love it, even though you have toiled hard to make it look effortless.

A TED Talk is 18 minutes long
A TED Talk is 18 minutes long

TED curator Chris Anderson explains:
The 18-minute length works much like the way Twitter forces people to be disciplined in what they write. By forcing speakers who are u...

Give a TED-style talk that gets a lot of views
  • Arrange your message onto the 9-up format: same size as sticky notes, until you are happy with the flow.
  • Solicit feedback from effective presenters that you trust to give honest, unfiltered feedback on your narrative and slides.
  • Rehearse with a great (honest) communicator that is not afraid to speak up.
  • Articulate each point clearly.
  • Practice with a clock counting up the minutes, to know how much you're over. Then trim it down.
  • Once you're within the timeframe, practice with a clock counting down. Know where you should be at 6, 12 and 18 minutes.
  • Let your coach jot down what you say well and what you don’t.
  • Don’t be camera shy. Practice by videotaping yourself.
  • Do one more full timed rehearsal right before you walk on stage.
  • Pick two natural places you could stop in your talk, then demarcate those as possible endings.