How To Make Better Decisions - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Why We Make Bad Choices (And How To Stop)

How To Make Better Decisions

How To Make Better Decisions
  • Analyze objectively your assumptions, feelings and expectations
  • Focusing only on the problem limits options for a solution and leads to energy depletion and decisions out of anxiety and frustration. Expand your perspective to be able to see other things, and often a solution will appear somewhere in the composition.
  • Rather than thinking in terms of bad and good when making decision, try to see a more balanced view by embracing the uncertainty of every situation. 

61 SAVES


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Work on the right decision

The way you frame your decision at the outset can make all the difference. 

State your decision problems carefully, acknowledge their complexity and avoid unwarranted assumptions ...

Specify your objectives

A decision is a means to an endAsk yourself what you most want to accomplish and which of your interests, values, concerns, fears, and aspirations are most relevant to achieving your goal.

Decisions with multiple objectives cannot be resolved by focusing on any one objective.

Create imaginative alternatives

Your decision can be no better than your best alternative.

Make all important & difficult decisions on paper

It relieves pressure from the situation and allows your mind to focus on the task at hand, rather than spiraling into self-doubt and second-guessing.

When making decisions, get clear about your reasons

You’ve got to get absolutely crystal clear about your outcome and your purpose. If you forget the reasons behind your decision, you won’t follow through. 

Don't let fear motivate your decision making

And don’t wait for absolute certainty because you’ll almost never get it. One of the ways to overcome this is to have a consistent process for making decisions. 

2,000 decisions per waking hour

Research has shown that the typical person makes about 2,000 decisions every waking hour. Most are minor ones and we make them automatically. But many have serious consequences.

That's why...

Decision fatigue

Our ability to perform mental tasks and make decisions wears thin when it’s repeatedly used.

Identify the most important decisions you need to make, and, as often as possible, prioritize your time so that you make them when your energy levels are highest.

A steady state of distraction

Our brains process five times as much information today as in 1986. Thus, many of us live in a continuous state of distraction and struggle to focus. 

To counter this, find time each day to unplug and step back from email, social media and news.