Content strategy defines: - Deepstash

Content strategy defines:

At its best, a content strategy defines:

  1. key themes and messages,
  2. recommended topics
  3. content purpose (i.e., how content will bridge the space between audience needs and business requirements)
  4. content gap analysis,
  5. metadata frameworks and related content attributes,
  6. search engine optimization (SEO), and implications of strategic recommendations on content creation, publication, and governance.

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MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

in her groundbreaking article, Content Strategy: the Philosophy of Data, Rachel Lovinger said:

The main goal of content strategy is to use words and data to create unambiguous content that supports meaningful, interactive experiences. We have to be experts in all aspects of communication in order to do this effectively.

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David Campbell, the founder of Saks Fifth Avenue, said, “Discipline is remembering what you want.”

When it comes to creating and governing content, it’s easy to forget what we want, or even worse, to settle for less.

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RELATED IDEAS

What Is Content Writing?

Content writing refers to creating content for online marketing purposes. With content, businesses can attract leads and foster positive connections with their audience, ultimately pushing them down the sales funnel.

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What Is A Content Audit?

A content audit is the process of systematically analyzing and assessing all the content on your website. The final objective is to reveal strengths and weaknesses in your content strategy and content development workflow, and adapt your content plan to your current marketing goals.

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How Does Google Scholar Work?

Google Scholar is a search engine for scholarly literature at major academic publishers & university presses that lets you find articles/citations on the topic of your choice.

It ranks documents based on the number of times an article has been viewed, printed, or downloaded within a set period of time (usually around 1 yr). Its aim is to rank documents the way researchers would: based on relevance & popularity.

Documents are added to its library when publishers submit them to the GS Metadata Program. From there, documents are indexed, ranked, & made available to searchers in search results.

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