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How to Minimize Your Life: The Unimportance of Practically Everything

Socrates
“The secret of happiness, you see, is not found in seeking more, but in developing the capacity to enjoy less.”

Socrates

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to Minimize Your Life: The Unimportance of Practically Everything

How to Minimize Your Life: The Unimportance of Practically Everything

https://www.dansilvestre.com/minimize-your-life/

dansilvestre.com

7

Key Ideas

Minimalizing Your Life

To minimize your life is choosing to live by design, not by default. You decide where to allocate your time, focus, and efforts.

Why Minimizing Your Life

What minimizing your life will bring you:

  • More Efficiency: You finally have enough time to do what’s truly important.
  • More Time: Owning and doing things carry high costs. Doing less frees up your time to focus on the essential few.
  • Less Stress: No more overloaded schedules, running from one place to the next, always rushing.
  • Better Health: having and doing less calms your mind and brings clarity.
  • Freedom: things don’t own you anymore, you only own things you love. 

How to Minimize Your Life

  1. Decide what’s unimportant: cover the low priorities of your life. You might discover you are focusing on the wrong priorities and cluttering your brain and wasting your time.
  2. Know what’s important: move to what’s really important to you. These are the things you love, bringing you joy.
  3. Question everything, constantly: adopt a new mentally of simplification, questioning yourself constantly if you are allocating your time, attention, and money, wisely.

Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs

“Deciding what not to do is as important as deciding what to do.”

Stephen Covey

Stephen Covey

“Anything less than a conscious commitment to the important is an unconscious commitment to the unimportant.” 

Cal Newport

Cal Newport

"Clarity about what matters provides clarity about what does not.”

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Oliver Emberton
"The secret to mastering your time is to systematically focus on importance and suppress urgency."
Oliver Emberton
Important vs. urgent tasks
  • Important tasks are things that contribute to your long-term mission, values, and goals.
  • Urgent tasks are tasks that have to be dealt with immediately: phone calls, urgent deadlines, and situations where you have to respond quickly.

Sometimes important tasks stare you right in the face, but you neglect them and respond to urgent but unimportant things.

Don't be available all the time

Time, not money, is your most valuable asset. Invest your asset:

  • Allocate time to each task you need to get done every day. 
  • Each task of the day should be attainable, realistic, and time-bound. And it should advance your goals for the day, week or month.
  • Don't get distracted by everything others expect you to do.

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What's Most Important To You
Before you can set your priorities, you need to figure out exactly what they are. 

"You have limited time and energy, so you need to determine what your top two priorities are at any giv...

Create An Action Plan

Take a few moments to create a plan of where you would like to see yourself in the next couple of months or years. 

Align those dreams with your priorities to help you focus on making your wishes come true. 

Designate Specific Time Slots For Tasks

It's important to remember to set time aside for things that truly matter to you. 

Whatever it is, you won't feel fulfilled if you constantly put other things before your own happiness.

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The new law of productivity

High-Quality Work Produced = (Time Spent) x (Intensity of Focus)

Deep work vs. Shallow work
  • Deep work: Professional activities performed in a state of distraction-free concentration that push your cognitive capabilities to their limit. Creates value.
  • Shallow work: Noncognitively demanding, logistical-style tasks, often performed while distracted. Doesn't create value.
4 philosophies to integrate Deep Work into your life
  • Monastic: maximize Deep Work by minimizing or removing shallow obligations. Isolate yourself for long periods of time without distractions; no shallow work allowed
  • Bimodal: divide your time into some clearly defined stretches to deep pursuits and leave the rest open to everything else. Reserve a few consecutive days when you will be working like a monastic. You need at least one day a week
  • Rhythmic: involves creating a routine where you define a specific time period — ideally three to four hours every day — that you can devote to Deep Work
  • Journalistic: alternate your day between deep and shallow work as it fits your blocks of time. Not recommended to try out first.

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