The 4 barriers for Organisational Knowledge Management - Deepstash
The 4 barriers for Organisational Knowledge Management

The 4 barriers for Organisational Knowledge Management

  1. The Supplier is Unwilling to share. He or she feels they will lose something (power, job security, reputation) if they give their knowledge away. 
  2. The User is Unwilling to learn. The unwilling user is afflicted by Not Invented Here (NIH) syndrome, feeling more secure in their own ("invented here") knowledge than in scary knowledge from somewhere else. 
  3. The Supplier is Unable to share "I don't know who to share this with". 
  4. The User is Unable to find knowledge - "needle in a haystack" - they don't know where to look. 

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4 Types of Knowledge

Declarative Knowledge:

  • Factual: Facts & concepts. This information can and must be learned through exposure & repetition. This includes the basics about an industry or job.
  • Conceptual: Related to factual knowledge, conceptual knowledge can be understood as knowing the interrelationships between elements that make up a larger structure. 

And:

  • Procedural Knowledge: how to accomplish something. It can be stolen through imitation and practice!
  • Metacognitive Knowledge: what you learn about learning. For example, one may realize a particular strategy is not working & try something else. 

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A compulsive behavior

It involves actions a person feels driven to do over and over again.

Compulsive actions may appear to be irrational or pointless, but the individuals may feel incapable of stopping themselves.

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The nervous system
  • It is a complex collection of nerves and specialized cells known as neurons that transmit signals between different parts of the body. It is essentially the body's electrical wiring.
  • Structurally, the nervous system has two components: the central nervous system (the brain, spinal cord, and nerves) and the peripheral nervous system (sensory neurons, ganglia and nerves that connect to one another and to the central nervous system).
  • Functionally, the nervous system has two main subdivisions: the somatic, or voluntary, component (nerves that connect to one another and to the central nervous system and the autonomic nervous system (regulates certain body processes, such as blood pressure and the rate of breathing, that work without conscious effort).

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