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Give Context and Use Examples

The way you frame your information matters--the language, terms, and examples you choose to use will have a huge impact on what your audience remembers and understands.

Paint a verbal picture. You will make the problem tangible, and the solution appealing.

@finbb246

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Presenting information is never about the presenter--it's always about the audience.

Get to know who they are, in order to use their common knowledge and experience: What's most important to them? What motivates them? What's their background? How do they prefer to communicate? What "language" do they tend to use?

To have a better chance of making complex information memorable, ask yourself these 2 questions:

  • If my audience will only remember one thing about my explanation, what is that "one thing?"
  • And, why should my audience care about this "one thing?"

While using long, technical words might seem impressive, it rarely helps anyone understand what's being said.

Opt for using simple, everyday language. Along those same lines, avoid any acronyms, jargon, or highly-niche phrases. When it's impossible to avoid, make sure to define any complex terms.

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RELATED IDEAS

Opt for using simple, everyday language. Avoid any acronyms, jargon, or highly niche phrases. When it’s impossible to avoid, make sure to define any complex terms.

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IDEAS

Try not to use technical language. If you do, make sure it is absolutely necessary in order to help the audience understand or appreciate your point – and ensure that you explain the word or term immediately afterwards.

Keep your words as simple and clear as possible, and use real-life examples and illustrations where possible. But don’t patronize your audience.

Use Details They Already Know

Find related information people already know and expand on that. For example, understanding what a blog is can be described as "it's a magazine, but online."  That's incredibly simplistic, but it gets the point across.