2 types of comparisons

2 types of comparisons
  • Downward comparison (comparing ourselves to those less fortunate): It activates the brain’s “lack” network, emphasizing our insecurity and focuses on safeguarding the status quo at the expense of risk and adventure.
  • Upward comparison (comparing ourselves to those we envy): it can excite feelings of envy and low self-esteem.

Both of these types of comparison can be bad for the brain

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Self Improvement

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

Checking the headlines

The news  can bring negativity: our impotence to do anything about most of what we hear can lead to a sense of hopelessness. It saps mental energy and focus.

Opting out of following the news won’t work for everyone, but try setting some clear boundaries around it. Consider deleting, even for a while, apps that you’re tempted to open all the time.

Toxic comparison

To break free from the temptation to compare, audit your social media feeds.

If you find yourself thinking about how your life matches up to a friend’s when you’re not on social media, try to shift your perspective. Think about their human traits, vulnerabilities, and things that you have in common. When you change your mindset, you can move from a place of jealousy to a place of empathy. 

Comfort eating

The first trick is to notice you’re doing it: Is it out of boredom? A self-soothing activity? Or some type of mechanism for coping with stress and anxiety?

Try to keep a diary for a few days. Spot the patterns. When you notice your cues and responses, you’ll learn to pause before you eat, rather than doing it automatically.

Multitasking

Each time we try and batch unrelated tasks together, we tax our brain and use up energy in the transition. 

To stop making multitasking a habit, you need to set boundaries around what you will be working on when. Give yourself longer chunks of time to complete one thing at a time, and shut down other distractions such as email when you’re working on something.

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RELATED IDEAS

... to improve any part of life: spending time around people with good habits will cause you to develop good habits.

For example: to improve your odds of starting a business, it will be hard to do from inside a cubicle surrounded by other people in other cubicles. To improve your odds of actually starting, find a friend who’s already done it or search for a local entrepreneurs get-together.

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IDEAS

You Are Not Your Thoughts
Our life situation is shaped by the quality of our thoughts. However, most of us assume that we are our thoughts.

Expectations are our idea of how we think the world should look. This may involve how we should feel, what we should have achieved, and how other people should be treating us.

We could set up expectations that are too high based on arbitrary rules and then become frustrated when we can't meet it.A good rule of thumb is if we are not working diligently toward something, or there is no proof for what we expect, then it may be unrealistic.

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