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4 Ways Your Non-Verbal Communication is Telling a Different Story Than Your Words

Voice tone and social status

People alter their tone of voice depending on social status. We adjust our voices depending on the persons we are talking to.

In essence, people change their tone of voice when in an anxiety-inducing context, without even being aware of it. And just like body posture, the language we use, or our facial shape and expressions, our voices are part of the arsenal of signals that affect perceptions of social status.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

4 Ways Your Non-Verbal Communication is Telling a Different Story Than Your Words

4 Ways Your Non-Verbal Communication is Telling a Different Story Than Your Words

https://www.inc.com/christina-desmarais/4-ways-your-non-verbal-communication-is-telling-a-different-story-than-your-words.html

inc.com

4

Key Ideas

Be careful with eye contact

When you are doing the speaking, you should look the person you're talking to directly in the eyes, but not so much when you're the person listening.

Making eye contact while your interlocutor is speaking actually harms your perceived competence.

Resist the urge to look at your phone

You cannot be present and involved in a conversation if you occasionally look at your phone. 

Whether you intend to or not, you're sending the message that the people you're talking with aren't as important as whatever text, snap or post is on your device. 

Put your phone out of your reach

Phones are altering the fabric of social life.

It's because researchers have found that people with access to their smartphone smile less at strangers, compared with those without devices.

Voice tone and social status

People alter their tone of voice depending on social status. We adjust our voices depending on the persons we are talking to.

In essence, people change their tone of voice when in an anxiety-inducing context, without even being aware of it. And just like body posture, the language we use, or our facial shape and expressions, our voices are part of the arsenal of signals that affect perceptions of social status.

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Lip signals
  • Pursed lips: an indicator of distaste, disapproval, or distrust.
  • Lip biting: signals people are worried, anxious, or stressed.
  • Covering the mouth: used when people want to hide an emotional reaction.
  • Turned up or down: When the mouth is slightly turned up, it might mean that the person is feeling happy or optimistic. A slightly down-turned mouth can be an indicator of sadness/ disapproval.
Gestures
  • A clenched fist indicates anger in some situations or solidarity in others.
  • A thumbs up and thumbs down: gestures of approval and disapproval.
  • The "okay" gesture: "okay" or "all right." In some parts of Europe, the same signal is used to imply you are nothing. In some South American countries, the symbol is actually a vulgar gesture.
  • The V sign: peace or victory in some countries. In the UK and Australia, the symbol takes on an offensive meaning when the back of the hand is facing outward.

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Facial expression in speech

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