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Does hitting the snooze button really help you feel better?

Don't snooze your alarm

It's probably best to set your alarm for a specific time and get up then.

Delaying getting out of bed for nine minutes by hitting the snooze is simply not going to give us any more restorative sleep. In fact, it may serve to confuse the brain into starting the process of secreting more neurochemicals that cause sleep to occur, according to some hypotheses.

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Does hitting the snooze button really help you feel better?

Does hitting the snooze button really help you feel better?

https://bigthink.com/surprising-science/snooze-button

bigthink.com

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Key Ideas

Why we hit the snooze button

It's important to understand why we are using the snooze button in the first place.

For some, it's a habit that started early on. But for many, it can signal a significant problem with sleep. And poor sleep has been shown to be associated with a number of health disorders including high blood pressure, memory problems, and even weight control.

What normal sleep looks like

Our natural body clock regulates functions through what's known as circadian rhythms: physical, mental and behavioral changes that follow a daily cycle.

Most adults require approximately 7,5-8 hours of good sleep per night. This enables us to spend adequate time in the stages of sleep known as nonrapid eye movement sleep (NREM) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM).

What affects sleep cycles

  • If a person is not breathing well during sleep (snoring or sleep apnea), this will disturb the normal sequences and cause the individual to awaken feeling unrestored.
  • Sleep quality can be diminished by the use of electronic devices, tobacco or alcohol in the evening. 
  • Even eating too close to bedtime can be problematic.

Don't snooze your alarm

It's probably best to set your alarm for a specific time and get up then.

Delaying getting out of bed for nine minutes by hitting the snooze is simply not going to give us any more restorative sleep. In fact, it may serve to confuse the brain into starting the process of secreting more neurochemicals that cause sleep to occur, according to some hypotheses.

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Don't eat any heavy foods within two hours of bed time. 

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Do Something After You Eat

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Avoid Napping

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Sleep quantity

Although eight hours is the common mention, optimum sleep can vary from person to person and from age to age.

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