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The Five Rules for Self-Care - Mindful

Self-Care Is Difficult

It is much easier for us to make decisions that feel good right now (“quick-fixes”) than it is to have the discipline to make decisions that may suck now but feel really great later.

Self-care can be really hard because it’s a long-term play. But your well-being is worth the trouble. 

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The Five Rules for Self-Care - Mindful

The Five Rules for Self-Care - Mindful

https://www.mindful.org/the-five-rules-for-self-care-in-politically-charged-times/

mindful.org

5

Key Ideas

Self-Care Is Not One-Size Fits All

You have to start giving up most of your vices in order to truly dedicate yourself to self-care and to larger causes. But there are healthy indulgences we can enjoy.

These are defined by small actions we can take that help us restore balance in our lives, and bring us joy and happiness. 

Self-Care Is Difficult

It is much easier for us to make decisions that feel good right now (“quick-fixes”) than it is to have the discipline to make decisions that may suck now but feel really great later.

Self-care can be really hard because it’s a long-term play. But your well-being is worth the trouble. 

Self-Care Is Not Self-Indulgence

  • Self-indulgence is the “excessive or unrestrained gratification of one’s own appetites, desires, or whims. Self-indulgent behaviors alter our mood or provide us with a means of temporary escape.
  • Self-care yields you long-term benefits without causing harm. And in a way, it’s a selfless act as it will make you a more engaged and impassioned person. 

Self-Care Is Inclusive

Self-care has become a female-centered, elitist and commercialized activity often seen as frivolous and as an “occasional” practice. 

But self-care is for everyone and a collective goal, not a commodity good.

Your “Self” Is Bigger Than You

Self-care means putting ourselves first and we’ve been conditioned to believe this is wrong and selfish. But the “self” goes beyond the individual to include all the things we interact with.

When we practice self-care, we hone our interactions with everything around us: we protect the world around and do it better. 

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3 ways to practice self-care
  1. Allow yourself to unplug from the news and social media for a few days.
  2. Recognize when you need self-care and then respond to that need.
Self-control
Self-control

It’s your ability to resolve conflicts between your short-term desires and your long-term goals.

For example, successful self-control means sacrificing immediate pleasure (cookies a...

Why self-control matters

People who have high self-control aren’t missing out on enjoyment. Not being able to resist temptation and enjoying life are not the same things.

They tend to eat in a healthily way, exercise more, sleep better, drink less alcohol, smoke fewer cigarettes, achieve higher grades at university, have more peaceful relationships, and are more financially secure.

Biological limits to self-control

Research showed that self-control is ultimately limited by our biology. We can’t exercise effortful self-control indefinitely – the brain has to do regular maintenance to remain functional.

6 more ideas

Self-criticism

It compromises your goals and undermines your pursuits, whether they are academic, health related, personal, or professional.

Self-criticism predicts depression, avoidance behaviors, loss of ...

Self-compassion

It generates resilience, it empowers you to be flexible, and gives you the ability to identify problems, accept negative feedback from others, and change habits that no longer serve you.

Practice self-care at work
  • Use lunch as an act of self-care. Take a moment to notice this nourishment you’re giving yourself. 
  • Remember that, just like you, everybody feels like a fraud to a certain degree.
  • Helping people makes us feel good about ourselves and connected to others. So, instead of defaulting to “No, thanks” or “ I’m fine” when someone offers you something, try saying yes.