Getting Comfortable With Debate - Deepstash

Getting Comfortable With Debate

Without practice and encouragement, debate is uncomfortable.

Establish a “permission zone” that empowers your people with the freedom to confront the hard topics and the confidence to challenge assumptions in how your organization “always” does things. This change in perspective results in massive new opportunities to elevate your business. 

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One of the best ways to get the very best ideas for your organization and tap into the power of the crowd is by encouraging active debate at all levels of the organization

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How To Encourage Debate

At McKinsey, you are supposed to feel profoundly unsettled if people around you are not engaged in debate, challenging your ideas. Junior-level staffers are empowered to challenge their senior advisors, as long as it helps to create a more innovative solution. 

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Criticism ≠ Debate

To ensure that the best ideas really do win, you can encourage employees to debate with facts and data, rather than with personal criticism. 

Steve Jobs of Apple has compared the process of organizational debate to a rock tumbler, in which the process of grinding up rocks makes a lot of noise and friction, but what comes out is beautiful and refined. 

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