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4 Sleep Myths That You Need To Stop Believing

8 Hours Of Sleep

Although it is recommended that healthy adults should aim for seven to nine hours of sleep, everyone is different. There are people who need just three to four hours to stay alert. 

If you’re not sure how many hours of sleep you need on a daily basis, experimentation is the best way to go. Try waking up without an alarm and figure out what your natural wake-up time is. Observe how adding or subtracting one hour of sleep impacts your productivity.

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4 Sleep Myths That You Need To Stop Believing

4 Sleep Myths That You Need To Stop Believing

https://www.fastcompany.com/40554502/4-sleep-myths-that-you-need-to-stop-believing

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

Getting Sufficient Sleep

When you’re consistently not getting enough sleep, you get used to feeling tired, and your body adapts to function on that amount of sleep. But this doesn’t mean that you’re performing at your best on this amount of sleep. 

Even when you don’t feel physically tired–your brain might think otherwise. If you find yourself unable to remember things or can’t seem to be nice to your coworkers, for example, you might be running a sleep debt.

“Catch Up” Sleep On Weekends

The harm of bingeing on sleep on Saturday and Sunday is that it makes it hard to get a full and well-constructed night of sleep on Sunday night, which then sends us off into the workweek on the wrong foot.

If you don’t try to wake up at a similar time at the weekend, it is similar to giving yourself jet lag every weekend.

Train Yourself To Be A Morning Person

Sorry, night owls, no amount of aromatherapy or hypnosis will make you fall asleep at 9 p.m. And early birds, it doesn’t matter how much coffee you drink–you don’t do your best work at night. 

You’re born with one tendency or the other, so you might as well work it as best as you can.

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