“It is not primarily our physical selves that... - Deepstash

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The nature of mindsets

“It is not primarily our physical selves that limit us but rather our mindset about our physical limits.” 

Ellen Langer

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The natural preferences of our brain
The natural preferences of our brain

In a perfect world, we would use both success and failure as instructive lessons. But our brain doesn't learn that way. It learns more from some experiences than others.

Confirm...

Choice influences our decision-making

A study found that choice had an apparent influence on decision-making. In the studies subjects learned more when they had a free choice and when the choice gave a higher reward.

However, when participants were forced to select a specific choice, they were less invested in the outcomes, similar to a child mindlessly practicing to please a parent.

Choice-confirmation bias

When people can make a free choice, they embrace positive or negative outcomes that confirm they were right.

Studies show that this tendency persists in both poor and rich conditions. This means the brain is primed to learn with a bias linked to our freely chosen actions. The brain learns differently and more quickly from free choices than forced ones.

What a Fixed Mindset is

It's a mentality that seeks validation. The individual builds a certain degree of knowledge and skills due to various reasons. Then, instead of consistently improving them, the person begins to see...

Disadvantages of a Fixed Mindset
  • It provokes dissatisfaction and disappointment.
  • It decreases self-knowledge and self-awareness. 
  • It cuts off opportunities. A fixed mindset person is usually afraid to take risks.
  • It encourages mediocrity.
  • It attracts mediocre relationships that will hardly bring long-term satisfaction.
  • It leads to stagnation.
What a Growth Mindset is

The growth-oriented person perceives failures as useful feedback. He doesn’t stop to wonder if he’s appreciated by others or if he should do more to impress. The growth-oriented person seeks excellence through practice. 

This involves consistency and persistence. When failing, he doesn’t get discouraged but rather motivated to succeed the next time.

If you believe things about yourself like…
  • “It's hard for me to lose weight.”
  • “I'm not good with numbers.”
  • “I'm not a natural athlete.”
  • “I'm not creative.”
  • “I'm a procrastinator.”

...it...

Actions change your beliefs

It's your daily actions that will change what you believe about yourself and the person you become. 

Focus on the process. Focus on showing up,  on sticking to the schedule, on “not quitting.

Eventually, the results and the self–confidence will come anyway.