Maintaining weight loss - Deepstash

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Why Weight Loss Diets Fail

Maintaining weight loss

The actual food you eat isn’t the main thing that enables you to keep weight off.

Maintaining a weight-reduced state is a lifelong journey and many dietary approaches can work to facilitate weight loss and keep it off.

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Why Weight Loss Diets Fail

Why Weight Loss Diets Fail

https://www.self.com/story/why-diets-fail

self.com

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Key Ideas

People struggle to keep weight off

Researchers have observed weight regain following weight loss across a range of populations and types of weight-loss diets.

Why long-term weight loss is so hard

The brain’s response to caloric restriction tends to be to increase cravings for foods that are highly rewarding and reducing our perception of being full. 

Diets frequently fail because they have an endpoint and are not a real lifestyle change. Maintaining a lifestyle that promotes a healthy weight and metabolism is often a lifelong journey. 

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Dieting

Dieting can pretty fast become an obsession, as shown by today's individuals who, influenced by everything that the media is promoting, want, at all costs, to be fit and slim.

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The diet industry

When dieting, not only does the individual lose weight, but he or she is at risk of losing also a large amount of money. The diet industry generates high income every year, taking advantage of people's obsession to look fit. 

However, it often happens that these diets who are supposed to work wonders end up by making people lose only money and no kilos whatsoever.

Dieting and its results

As shocking as it may seem, diets are not the key to a forever slim body

Research has shown that most of the people, who have dieted at some point in their life, end up by regaining the initial weight or even more than they had when they started the diet.

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Food cues

When we are hungry, the hormone ghrelin stimulates the brain. Our brains pay more attention to cues for unhealthy foods—those which are high in sugar and fat—than healthy foods when we are hungry.&...

Forbidden foods are more tempting

Dieting often involves “giving up” more pleasurable foods in an attempt to reduce calorie intake. But if we are asked to avoid eating the food we enjoy, researchers have found that we will crave it.

The behavioral and cognitive response to deprivation may inadvertently be creating more temptation.

The “what-the-hell” effect

A problem with dieting rules is that only a small violation—a sneaky slice of cake, for example—is enough to derail the whole diet. Researchers call this the “what-the-hell effect”. 

Diets that require the dieter to follow rigid rules or forbid them from consuming foods they enjoy appear to be problematic, as they paradoxically increase the risk of overeating. 

What successful diets have in common
  • Low in added sugar. 
  • Eliminate refined carbs. 
  • Avoid vegetable oils high in Omega-6 Fat.
  • Eliminate artificial trans fats, linked to inflammation and condition...