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How To Turn Complicated Ideas Into Simple Concepts

The “One Thing” They Should Understand

If something is too complicated, people are most likely to be confused by it, or worse, forget about it.

Ask yourself:

  1. If my audience will only remember one thing about my explanation, what is that “one thing?”
  2. And, why should my audience care about this “one thing?”

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How To Turn Complicated Ideas Into Simple Concepts

How To Turn Complicated Ideas Into Simple Concepts

https://www.fastcompany.com/40508554/how-to-turn-complicated-ideas-into-simple-concepts

fastcompany.com

4

Key Ideas

Get To Know Your Audience

What’s most important to them? What motivates them? What’s their background? How do they prefer to communicate? What “language” do they tend to use?

By understanding who the person (or people) you’re speaking to is, you’re able to use their common knowledge or experience to decide how best to explain your idea.

The “One Thing” They Should Understand

If something is too complicated, people are most likely to be confused by it, or worse, forget about it.

Ask yourself:

  1. If my audience will only remember one thing about my explanation, what is that “one thing?”
  2. And, why should my audience care about this “one thing?”

Give Context

The way you frame your information matters – the language, terms, and examples you choose to use will have a huge impact on what your audience remembers and understands.

So, paint a verbal picture. By sharing information, you make the problem tangible, and the solution appealing.

Watch Your Language

Opt for using simple, everyday language. Avoid any acronyms, jargon, or highly niche phrases. When it’s impossible to avoid, make sure to define any complex terms.

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Get to Know Your Audience

Presenting information is never about the presenter--it's always about the audience.

Get to know who they are, in order to use their common knowledge and experience: What's most imp...

The "One Thing" To Remember

To have a better chance of making complex information memorable, ask yourself these 2 questions:

  • If my audience will only remember one thing about my explanation, what is that "one thing?"
  • And, why should my audience care about this "one thing?"
Give Context and Use Examples

The way you frame your information matters--the language, terms, and examples you choose to use will have a huge impact on what your audience remembers and understands.

Paint a verbal picture. You will make the problem tangible, and the solution appealing.

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What you say, and how you say it

When trying to explain complex information to an audience, the first task is to get the content of what you're saying right. 

How we communicate is also cr...

How much technical detail to include

Try not to use technical language. If you do, make sure it is absolutely necessary in order to help the audience understand or appreciate your point – and ensure that you explain the word or term immediately afterwards.

Keep your words as simple and clear as possible, and use real-life examples and illustrations where possible. But don’t patronize your audience.

How to use body language

If you look alert but relaxed, your audience will mirror this and feel the same way. Stand up straight, but relax any tension or stiffness in your body. 

It’s a good idea to gesture with your hands in such a way that helps to make clear what you are explaining – but only do this if it feels natural, and try not to wave your arms around unnecessarily.

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A winning pitch

A winning pitch starts with a winning logline: one or two sentences that explain what your idea is about. Loglines attract attention.

To influence the people who can turn your idea into r...

Find your elevator pitch
What is your presentation about? What does your startup or product do? What’s your idea?
When a listener doesn't understand the overall idea being presented in a pitch, they have a hard time grasping the information. It is then important to answer in a clear, concise and engaging way, in order to explain a complex idea. Identify the key elements instead of focusing on details.
Keep it short

A logline should be easy to say and easy to remember. For instance, Sergey Brin and Larry Page told capital investor Michael Moritz: “Google organizes the world’s information and makes it universally accessible." The pitch was clear and had a sense of purpose.

Challenge yourself to keep it under 140 characters.

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The value of solid writing skills
  • Being a good writer helps you stand out from the crowd.
  • Repeated writing mistakes affect your reputation and credibility in the future.
  • Your writing is ...
Kurt Vonnegut
Kurt Vonnegut

"Why should you examine your writing style with the idea of improving it? Do so as a mark of respect for your readers, whatever you’re writing.

The “5 Ws + H” method

... for establishing what and how you will write:

  • Who: Who is my audience?
  • What: What do they need to know?
  • When: When does this apply, when did this happen, or when do they need to know it by?
  • Where: Where is this happening?
  • Why: Why do they need this information?
  • How: How should they use this information?

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Common budgeting mistakes
  1. Not Tracking Expenses: it's impossible to stick to your budget if you don't know where your money is going.
  2. Buying on Impulse: Impulse buying is expensive.&nb...
Tracking expenses
One of the ugly truths about budgeting is that when you keep track of your expenses, it’s painfully clear when you’ve gone off track. 

Write it down when you’ve gone over your budget. The negativity you feel will help prevent you from overspending more or doing it again. Just think of this step as damage control.

Being frugal and miserable

If you try to deprive yourself too much, you’ll binge later and throw all your hard work out the window. 

A spending binge can set you back far more than treating yourself occasionally, so go for the occasional minor splurge. Just keep your treats within your spending limits and you’ll be fine.

Fun Money

In a 'zero-based' budget, where we are putting every dollar to work for us, we have to put aside some 'fun money', a budget line for our fun activities, like a fancy cappuccino or the new shoes we...

Plan For Some Fun

A budget isn't about restrictions or a speed breaker to your freedom, but a way to plan for your freedom and fun, responsibly.

When you have every aspect of your financial life and goals planned out, you do not feel guilty having a little fun, and the fun budget is your permission to spend.

Your Fun Mileage May Vary

Each one of us has different levels of income, debt, and savings goals.

If one is new to budgeting and has limited resources, it is prudent to keep the fun money to a bare minimum. It is also fun to stretch your dollars, getting more for less, using creative ways. For instance, you can buy second-hand instead of buying everything new, to save your dollars.

Savings hacks are always a good idea, and there are several Apps available to help you manage your spending.

Focus on your camera

Practice looking into your camera during video conferences when you speak, even for brief moments.
It's challenging to focus on your camera for an entire meeting, but know that you increase the ...

Maintain a strong voice

Strong voices convey authority, credibility, and confidence.
Using a loud voice will also keep you from mumbling and from speaking too quickly due to the amount of breath required.

Frame yourself in the right way

Make sure you have time before the meeting to pick your location and put your head fully in frame.
In a video conference, your head and the top of your shoulders should dominate the screen. Also, be mindful of your background. Distracting elements will pull attention away from you.

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Why Interviewers Ask It

This introductory question serves as an icebreaker to lend an easy flow to the conversation. It helps the recruiter to get to know you in terms of hard and soft skills.

It’s a great op...

How to build your response
  • Present: Talk a little bit about what your current role is, the scope of it, and possibly a recent achievement.
  • Past: Tell the interviewer how you got there and/or mention a past experience that’s relevant to the job and company you’re applying for.
  • Future: Continue with what you’re looking to do next and why you’re interested in this job.
You do not have to respond in this order. Tweak it to suit you. Make sure to tie it to the job and company.
Tailor Your Answer

Interviewers want to know how your answer about yourself is relevant to the position and company you’re applying for.

This is an opportunity to articulate why you’re interested and how your objective fulfills their goals. In order to do that, spend some time researching the company. If your answers resonate with them, it shows that you really understand the role.

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Building Rapport Remotely

To better build rapport and counter isolation do the following:

  • smile, tilt your chin lower so you're not looking down on them, and slow down your speech during your vid...
Relying On Text The Right Way

Voice and video calls can help you feel more in touch with your team and avoid the issues of asynchronous communication like time lags or misunderstandings.

However, you'll likely spend a lot of your day communicating via text as it’s a good way to interact without interrupting their work. So you need to be able to get your point across clearly and simply, show empathy and understanding, and be efficient to avoid wasted time.

Staying Up To Date

Remote workers can feel overwhelmed by the amount of text they have to process. So finding ways to keep on top of what's going on is imperative for communicating efficiently with others.

Create archive lists and CC irrelevant emails to them, so you can save and share them without flooding non-involved people. 

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4 Reasons Giving Constructive Criticism Goes Bad
  1. You’re not offering anything constructive if all you do is point out problems. You can still direct attention to an issue, but make sure that you follow up with a helpful su...