Being a brand ambassador - Deepstash

Being a brand ambassador

Encourage engineers to share their knowledge with others in ways that enrich the community. If they've solved a problem that others have struggled with, they should be able to share those solutions.

These are great opportunities to build your own engineering culture, learn from other engineers, and foster innovation in the wider community. It’s important that engineers are given the support to feel comfortable doing this. 

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MORE IDEAS FROM 5 ways engineers can make a positive impact outside the code editor

Problem-solving outside the code editor

Product engineers are experts at identifying, understanding and solving problems. But the problems you tackle – and therefore the impact that you have – don’t have to be limited to the work you do within a text editor or integrated development environment.

Having an impact outside the code editor is about finding ways to shape your company’s culture as much as you build the product. That way, your positive impact will be felt far and wide.

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The world’s best products are built by teams, not singularly brilliant and lone engineers. A defining characteristic of a product engineer is that they spend the time making sure that newer or more junior engineers that may be unfamiliar with the tech or processes not only understand what they are doing, but also why they are doing it.

In practice, this means a product engineer demonstrates technical leadership by creating processes that other people can follow, thereby enabling delegation and multiplying their effectiveness.

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Onboarding is often treated as a one or two-day interlude before we get to our “real” work. It’s focused on meeting a bunch of people, setting up our computer, walking through benefits, etc.

While these steps are important, this type of onboarding is generic and shallow and leaves huge gaps. When high-impact engineers invest in helping a new person become impactful themselves, it acts as a force multiplier and will pay dividends for the team and company.

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A shared set of values that your whole team buys into will help maintain the elements of company culture you hold dear.

Defining and iterating on values bottom-up as well as top-down means our values are something engineers have a sense of ownership of. In this way, they are not just empty words, but something we all have the opportunity to shape.

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Getting involved in interviewing candidates is perhaps the most obvious and direct way a product engineer can help out with hiring.

As your team grows, the two biggest challenges are ensuring the quality of candidates is high enough and that broader alignment is maintained. The interview process gives you a chance to gauge both quality and alignment or identify the risk of misalignment, so it is a crucial opportunity for any engineer to contribute to the long-term health of the engineering team.

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RELATED IDEA

  • Business and product strategy. As a principal engineer, it’s important to understand the overall strategy for your group and what you can do to support the goals it’s trying to achieve.
  • Team needs. Although you’re not part of a specific team, you’ll find yourself working with many teams across the business to achieve your goals. To prioritize effectively, identify the needs of the teams you work with most closely. 
  • Engineering org needs. Are there problems within the org that you could help with? Look out for initiatives that particularly interest you or that could help you develop some of your growth areas.
  • Personal goals. Consider your personal goals. Identify your strengths, goals you haven’t yet achieved, and areas you might need to improve, and incorporate feedback you’ve received from your manager and peers. 

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Grit- ask on how determined a person in pursuing his dreams.

Rigor- ask if there was a time he considered a data to make a decision.

Impact- ask for what he have contributed to any organization and his inspiration.

Teamwork- ask of his experiences on working with other people.

Ownership- ask for a time when he experienced "injustice".

Curiosity- Ask them something they have learned recently.

Polish- observe on how they keep confidently calm and humble.

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Design your hiring process with remote candidates in mind. Look for 3 main things:

  • A strong skill set relevant to their jobs: you need to feel confident that they can complete basic job tasks independently.
  • A candidate with an affinity for remote work.
  • Hire candidates who share your company’s values:  they’ll fit in faster if they share your cultural code.

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