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How To Spot A Lie In 5 Seconds (And The Biggest Lie I Ever Told In PR)

Recognize evasiveness

A deceptive person will talk around the issue without actually answering the initial question. 

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How To Spot A Lie In 5 Seconds (And The Biggest Lie I Ever Told In PR)

How To Spot A Lie In 5 Seconds (And The Biggest Lie I Ever Told In PR)

https://www.forbes.com/sites/cherylsnappconner/2018/02/10/how-to-spot-a-lie-in-5-seconds-and-why-it-matters-in-pr/

forbes.com

7

Key Ideas

Analyze vs. speculate

Assuming folded arms are a sign of lying behavior is speculation. 

Instead, consider whether the behavior is a result of your question, or possibly just nervousness.

Manage your bias

Deceptive people can flood you with truthful answers and make you believe that they are good people. 

Filter through all the information that is meant to deceive you to get to the real untruths.

Recognize evasiveness

A deceptive person will talk around the issue without actually answering the initial question. 

Watch for failure to deny

Listen and search for the direct denial of an accusation. 

A guilty person will try to qualify the situation by  saying words like “not really” or “not for the most part.” 

Beware of aggression

A deceptive person will get angry at the question. They may attempt to redirect the situation by accusing the questioner of discrimination or bias or by attacking a third party.

Watch for adding disqualifiers

Where a response of yes or no would convey the answer, the responder launches into a convincing explanation instead of answering the question. They may add disqualifiers such as “I won’t lie to you” or “honestly” in an attempt to convince.

Look at the nonverbal cues

The person will enter a phase of fight or flight. The strain of deception will typically cause the skin to flush or to turn cold and itch. The person will scratch their ears or nose. They will answer too quickly.  They might fidget or suddenly tap nervously.

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