Relationships Matter - Deepstash
Relationships Matter

Relationships Matter

The mortality risks associated with loneliness exceeds those associated with obesity and physical inactivity and are comparable to the risks of smoking. 

Digital connections cannot replace in-person ones and the value of physical presence and touch.

MORE IDEAS FROM We've Reached Peak Wellness. Most of It Is Nonsense.

The Passion Mindset

It's the belief that you’ll find an activity or pursuit about which you are immediately passionate from the start. This is quite misleading and even harmful.

Better than this is a development mindset, in which you understand that passion takes time to emerge, thus lowering the bar for further engagement in something from “this is perfect” to “this is interesting.

Don’t Hide Your Feelings

Modern-day wellness creates the impression that everyone is happy all the time and that you should be, too. But this is not the reality of being human.

Hiding or repressing sadness only makes it worse. On the contrary, the more vulnerable you are (with yourself and others) the better. And if something feels way off, don’t be scared to get help.

Ignore diets and supplements and, instead, just aim to cut out junk like processed and fried foods.

Extensive studies have found that 16 of the most popular supplements and 8 of the most popular diets have virtually no benefit and some cause harm.

Cultivate Purpose

Though purpose doesn't need to be based on organized religion, cultivating a cohesive sense of direction, core values, and connection with something beyond yourself is important.

For some, this takes the form of going to church, synagogue, mosque, or sangha. For others it’s about feeling connected to evolution and being a part of nature. 

Wellness is simple: it’s about committing to basic practices as individuals and communities. And unfortunately, these basics tend to get overlooked in favor of easy-to-market nonsense.

Nourishing the 5 interrelated dimensions of health (physical, emotional, cognitive, social, spiritual, and environmental) does not require that you buy any lotions, potions, or pills.

It's a lifestyle or state of being that goes beyond merely the absence of disease and into the idea of maximizing human potential. 

Once someone’s basic needs are met (e.g., food and shelter), wellness emerges from nourishing six dimensions of your health: physical, emotional, cognitive, social, spiritual, and environmental.

When you are working on something, regardless of what it is, eliminate distractions so you can give it your full attention.

The more present and fully engaged you are with what’s in front of you, the happier you’ll be. 

Move Your Body

30 minutes of moderate to intense daily physical activity lowers your risk for heart disease, Alzheimer’s, mental illness, and many types of cancer.

Any kind of activity that makes your breathing labored for a sustained period does the trick.

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RELATED IDEA

"Being spiritual" nowadays signals:
  1. People that believe there is more to the world than meets the eye, more than the mere material. 
  2. People that attend to their inner life (their mental and emotional states) in the hopes of gaining self-knowledge. 
  3. People that value the following virtues: being compassionate, empathetic and open-hearted.
The Flow State

Flow is characterized by complete concentration in the activity at hand, resulting in a loss in one’s sense of space and time. It’s a state of both high challenge and high skill—a place where we’re capable of stretching ourselves to overcome difficulty.
Anyone is capable of inducing such a state of deep productivity and creativity.

Worry

Worry is the cognitive part of anxiety, with it's repetitive and obsessive thought patterns in our mind. Worry is sometimes essential for us to solve problems or take action, provided we are not stuck in a constant state of worry.

Ways to Handle Worry:

  • Allot some time a day, say 15 to 20 minutes, to worry about problems.
  • Be aware of your worrying, and push yourself into action.
  • Write your worries down, as it can calm obsessive thoughts.