Time Inconsistency - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

The Akrasia Effect: Why We Don't Follow Through on Things

Time Inconsistency

It refers to our tendency to choose immediate rewards over future rewards. It's why we make plans, but don't take action.

When we make plans, we are actually making plans for our future selves. But when the time comes to make a decision, we are in the moment and our brain is thinking about the present self.

638 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The Akrasia Effect: Why We Don't Follow Through on Things

The Akrasia Effect: Why We Don't Follow Through on Things

https://jamesclear.com/akrasia

jamesclear.com

5

Key Ideas

The Akrasia Effect

Akrasia happens when you do one thing even though you know you should do something else.

It's what prevents you from following through on what you set out to do. It could be translated into procrastination or a lack of self-control.

Delayed Gratification and Success

The ability to delay gratification is a great predictor of success in life.

If you really understand how to resist the attraction of instant gratification, you'll be able to bridge the gap between where you are and where you want to be.

Beating Procrastination

  • Design your future actions, using a commitment device (a choice you make in the present that controls your actions in the future). 
  • Reduce the friction of starting. Once you begin, it's often less painful to do the work. Make the beginning easy.
  • Utilize implementation intentions: State your intention to implement a particular behavior at a specific time in the future (with date, place and time).

“On a moment-to-moment basis, being in the middle of doing the work is usually less painful than being in the middle of procrastinating.”

“On a moment-to-moment basis, being in the middle of doing the work is usually less painful than being in the middle of procrastinating.”

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Akrasia Effect
The Akrasia Effect

Resistance towards what can help us progress is something human beings are experiencing for centuries. Philosophers call this extremely active and relentless force Akrasia...

Akrasia And Emotional Management

Akrasia is an emotional management problem keeping us from having a better future. It will make up any story to keep us away from something good. It will always prefer instant gratification, harming us in the long run, rather than doing something valuable that can help us in a positive way.

The side effects of Akrasia are stress, guilt, resentment, and missed opportunities.

Approaching Akrasia With Mindfulness

While the much-hyped motivation and willpower have little effect against Akrasia, mindfulness meditation has the power to refocus your actions, and stop the mindless time-wasting.

Mindfulness acts as a foundation for conquering procrastination. We need to proactively take control of our feelings and act towards our goals, something which is possible only with a mind sharpened with mindfulness.

3 more ideas

Procrastinating and emotions

According to traditional thinking, procrastinators have a time-management problem. They are unable to understand how long a task will take and need to learn how to schedule their time better.

Short-term mood lifters

Studies show low mood only increases procrastination if enjoyable activities are available as a distraction. In other words, we're drawn to other activities to avoid the discomfort of applying ourselves.

Adverse consequences

Procrastination leads to two primary consequences.

  1. It's stressful to keep putting off important tasks and failing to meet your goals.
  2. Procrastination often involves delaying important health behaviors, such as taking up exercise or visiting a doctor.

one more idea

Why you procrastinate

Procrastination is fundamentally an emotional reaction to what you have to do. The more aversive a task is to you, the more you’ll resist it, and the more likely you are to procrastinate.

Make a task less aversive

When you notice yourself procrastinating, use your procrastination as a trigger to examine a task’s characteristics and think about what you should change.

By breaking down exactly which attributes an aversive task has (boring, frustrating, difficult, meaningless, ambiguous, unstructured), you can take those qualities and turn them around to make the task more appealing to you.

Unproductive responses

... people have when they procrastinate:

  • Distracting yourself, and thinking about other things
  • Forgetting what you have to do, either actively or passively
  • Downplaying the importance of what you have to do
  • Focusing on your other values and qualities that will solidify your sense of self
  • Denying responsibility to distance yourself from what you have to do
  • Seeking out new information that supports your procrastination.

9 more ideas